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When compiling this code I get the error, "Error: initialization with '{...}' expected for aggregate object" at my function calls. I am compiling using Visual Studio 11.

#include <iostream>
#include <string>
#include <array>
using namespace std;

typedef std::array<string, 5> string_t;
string_t centerString(std::array<string, 5> (&tempArray),unsigned short int length);
string_t evenString(std::array<string, 5> (&tempArray),unsigned short int length);

int main(){
    std::array<string, 5> aArray = {"a","aa","aaa","aaaa","aaaaa"};

    std::array<string, 5> evenStr[5] = evenString(aArray,5);
    std::array<string, 5> centerStr[5] = centerStr(aArray,5);
}


 string_t evenString(std::array<string, 5> (&srcArray),unsigned short int length){
     std::array<string, (sizeof(srcArray)/sizeof(srcArray[0]))> trgtArray= {};
     for(unsigned short int x = 0; x < (sizeof(srcArray)/sizeof(srcArray[0]));x++){
         trgtArray[x] = srcArray[x];
         for(unsigned short int y = 0; y < (length-trgtArray[x].length()); y++){
             trgtArray[x] += " ";
         }
     }

     return(trgtArray);
}

 string_t centerString(std::array<string, 5> (&srcArray),unsigned short int length){
     std::array<string, (sizeof(srcArray)/sizeof(srcArray[0]))> trgtArray= {};
     unsigned short int remainder;
     string spacer = "";
     for(unsigned short int x = 0; x < (sizeof(srcArray)/sizeof(srcArray[0]));x++){
         remainder = length - srcArray[x].length();
         if((remainder % 2) == 0){
            trgtArray[x] = srcArray[x];
            for(unsigned short int y = 0; y < (length-srcArray[x].length()); y++){
                trgtArray[x] += " ";
            }
         }else{
             for(unsigned short int z = 0; z < (remainder/2); z++){
                 spacer += " ";
             }
             trgtArray[x] = spacer + srcArray[x] + spacer + " ";
         }
     }

     return(trgtArray);
 }
share|improve this question
2  
You might want to consider std::array. –  chris Dec 3 '12 at 23:03
    
I'm not certain string a = {}; is a valid notation. In any case, what compiler and version are you using? –  Mooing Duck Dec 3 '12 at 23:03
    
You can't return an array by value in c++, not directly anyway. You should do as chris suggested. –  StoryTeller Dec 3 '12 at 23:05
2  
Probably didn't pass the -std=c++11 flag. Also, you are returning a reference to a local in both functions. –  Jesse Good Dec 3 '12 at 23:07
1  
I am not passing an array directly. It should be returning the reference to the array. –  Brook Julias Dec 3 '12 at 23:08

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You are returning temporary reference in centerString

string_t& centerString(std::array<string, 5> (&tempArray),unsigned short int length);

centerStr is array, can't use it as function

std::array<string, 5> centerStr = centerStr(aArray,5);

I guess you mean

std::array<string, 5> centerStr = centerString(aArray,5);

You could try below sample function, just return array out, RVO should kick in.

std::array<string,5> evenString(std::array<string, 5> (&srcArray), unsigned short length){
     std::array<string,5> trgtArray = {};
    //....
     return trgtArray;
}  

std::array<string, 5> evenStr = evenString(aArray,5);
std::array<string, 5> centerStr = centerString(aArray,5);
share|improve this answer
    
Wouldn't this be returning an array directly? I was under the understanding that this could not be done in C++. –  Brook Julias Dec 3 '12 at 23:36
1  
std::array is a container, it's not raw array, should be able to use it like vector etc. –  billz Dec 3 '12 at 23:37
    
I made the changes you suggested, but the code persists. –  Brook Julias Dec 3 '12 at 23:41
    
see my updated answer std::array<string, 5> centerStr = centerString(aArray,5); –  billz Dec 3 '12 at 23:43
    
Sweet thanks this solved it. –  Brook Julias Dec 3 '12 at 23:48

Don't ever use native arrays, they suck horrifically, and this is one of the ways in which they suck. Basically, this would require that arrays act sanely and they do not. Language-enforced bad basically means that they can't do a whole host of things that you would expect from any other data type, and they're really not worth the time to use when you could just use std::array like a baus sane person.

Use std::array and be grateful that even the Committee accepts the suckage of C arrays.

I, interestingly, note that you did indeed include <array>, but then did not use std::array.

share|improve this answer
    
I have since changed it to use #include <array> and the problem persists. –  Brook Julias Dec 3 '12 at 23:14
    
Where was he passing or returning an array? –  Mooing Duck Dec 3 '12 at 23:14
1  
Adding the include doesn't do anything. You have to go and use the template defined there, std::array. –  Puppy Dec 3 '12 at 23:14
    
Sometimes arrays are all you need, saying "don't ever use them" is just overly dogmatic and plain silly. Of course there are valid use cases for arrays (not saying that's the case here though). In this case a std::array would still be wrong as the OP is returning a reference to a local. –  Ed S. Dec 3 '12 at 23:19
    
@BrookJulias, To get you started: std::array<int, 5> myArray{{1, 3, 5, 7, 9}}; std::array<int, 5> &someRef = myArray; std::cout << someRef.size();. It's pretty intuitive. –  chris Dec 3 '12 at 23:19

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