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  1. I created a pipe between two child processes, first, I run ls, which writes to the proper fd, then, I run grep r, which reads from the proper fd,

  2. I can see in the terminal that the grep command works fine (the output)

  3. The problem is that grep doesn't quit, it stays there, even though ls isn't running anymore

for other programs the pipe works fine..

for (i = 0; i < commands_num ; i++) {   //exec all the commands instants
    if (pcommands[i]._flag_pipe_out == 1) { //creates pipe if necessary 
        if (pipe(pipe_fd) == -1) {
            perror("Error: \"pipe()\" failed");
        }
        pcommands[i]._fd_out = pipe_fd[1];
        pcommands[i+1]._fd_in = pipe_fd[0]; 
    }
    pid = fork();   //the child exec the commands  
    if (pid == -1) {
        perror("Error: \"fork()\" failed");
        break;          
    } else if (!pid) { //child process

        if (pcommands[i]._flag_pipe_in == 1) {  //if there was a pipe to this command
            if (dup2(pcommands[i]._fd_in, STDIN) == -1) {
                perror("Error: \"dup2()\" failed");
                exit(0);
            }
            close(pcommands[i]._fd_in);
        }

        if (pcommands[i]._flag_pipe_out == 1) { //if there was a pipe from this command
            if (dup2(pcommands[i]._fd_out, STDOUT) == -1) {
                perror("Error: \"dup2()\" failed");
                exit(0);
            }
            close(pcommands[i]._fd_out);
        } 
        execvp(pcommands[i]._commands[0] , pcommands[i]._commands); //run the command

        perror("Error: \"execvp()\" failed");
        exit(0);
    } else if (pid > 0) { //father process
    waitpid(pid, NULL, WUNTRACED);
    }
}
//closing all the open fd's
for (i = 0; i < commands_num ; i++) {
    if (pcommands[i]._fd_in != STDIN) { //if there was an other stdin that is not 0
        close(pcommands[i]._fd_in);
    }           
    if (pcommands[i]._fd_out != STDOUT) { //if there was an other stdout that is not 1
        close(pcommands[i]._fd_out);            
    }   
}

So, I have a "command" instant pcommands[i] It has: a flag of pipein,pipeout fdin,fdout, and a char** (for the real command, like "ls -l")

lets say everything is good, that means that:

pcommands[0]:
pipein=0
pipeout=1
char** = {"ls","-l",NULL}

pcommands[1]:
pipein=1
pipeout=0
char** = {"grep","r",NULL}

now, the loop will go twice (because I have two commands instants) at the first time, it will see the pcommands[0] has pipeout==1 create pipe do fork pcommands[0] has pipeout==1 child: dup2 to the stdout execvp

second time: doesn't create pipe do fork child: the pcomands[1] has pipein==1 then: dup2 to the input exevp ..

this command works, my output is:

errors.log exer2.pdf multipal_try

(all the things with 'r') but then it get stuck, and doesn't get out of grep.. in an other terminal i can see grep is still working

I hope I close all the fd's I need to close...

I don't understand why doesn't it work, it seems like I do it right (well, it works for other commands..)

can someone please help? thanks

share|improve this question
1  
You need to accept some of your past questions! –  Ben Dec 3 '12 at 23:14
    
what does that mean? how do i do that? –  hudac Dec 3 '12 at 23:35
    
In you past questions, you need to accept the answers if you think they are correct by clicking on the green tick near how many votes the answer has. If people see that you accept none of your answers then they wont want to answer your questions. –  Ben Dec 3 '12 at 23:36
    
Yeah fine, I didn't know that... I just thought i should give score with the upper arrow... Thanks! –  hudac Dec 3 '12 at 23:41

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You aren't closing enough pipe file descriptors.

Rule of Thumb:

  • If you use dup() or dup2() to duplicate a pipe file descriptor to standard input or standard output, you should close both of the original pipe file descriptors.

You also need to be sure that if the parent shell creates the pipe, it closes both of its copies of the pipe file descriptors.

Also note that the processes in a pipeline should be allowed to run concurrently. In particular, pipes have a limited capacity, and a process blocks when there's no room left in the pipe. The limit can be quite small (POSIX mandates it must be at least 4 KiB, but that's all). If your programs deal with megabytes of data, they must be allowed to run concurrently in the pipeline. Therefore, the waitpid() should occur outside the loop that launches the children. You also need to close the pipes in the parent process before waiting; otherwise, the child reading the pipe will never see EOF (because the parent could, in theory, write to the pipe, even though it won't).

You have structure members whose names start with an underscore. That's dangerous. Names starting with an underscore are reserved for the implementation. The C standard says:

ISO/IEC 9899:2011 §7.1.3 Reserved Identifiers

— All identifiers that begin with an underscore and either an uppercase letter or another underscore are always reserved for any use.
— All identifiers that begin with an underscore are always reserved for use as identifiers with file scope in both the ordinary and tag name spaces.

That means that if you run into problems, then the trouble is yours, not the system's. Obviously, your code works, but you should be aware of the problems you could run into and it is wisest to avoid them.


Sample Code

This is a fixed SSCCE based on the code above:

#include <assert.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <sys/wait.h>
#include <unistd.h>

typedef struct Command Command;
struct Command
{
    int _fd_out;
    int _fd_in;
    int _flag_pipe_in;
    int _flag_pipe_out;
    char **_commands;
};

typedef int Pipe[2];

enum { STDIN = STDIN_FILENO, STDOUT = STDOUT_FILENO, STDERR = STDERR_FILENO };

int main(void)
{
    char *ls_cmd[] = { "ls", 0 };
    char *grep_cmd[] = { "grep", "r", 0 };
    Command commands[] =
    {
        {
            ._fd_in  = 0, ._flag_pipe_in  = 0,
            ._fd_out = 1, ._flag_pipe_out = 1,
            ._commands = ls_cmd,
        },
        {
            ._fd_in  = 0, ._flag_pipe_in  = 1,
            ._fd_out = 1, ._flag_pipe_out = 0,
            ._commands = grep_cmd,
        }
    };
    int commands_num = sizeof(commands) / sizeof(commands[0]);

    /* Allow valgrind to check memory */
    Command *pcommands = malloc(commands_num * sizeof(Command));
    for (int i = 0; i < commands_num; i++)
        pcommands[i] = commands[i];

    for (int i = 0; i < commands_num; i++) {   //exec all the commands instants
        if (pcommands[i]._flag_pipe_out == 1) { //creates pipe if necessary
            Pipe pipe_fd;
            if (pipe(pipe_fd) == -1) {
                perror("Error: \"pipe()\" failed");
            }
            pcommands[i]._fd_out = pipe_fd[1];
            pcommands[i+1]._fd_in = pipe_fd[0];
        }
        pid_t pid = fork();   //the child exec the commands
        if (pid == -1) {
            perror("Error: \"fork()\" failed");
            break;
        } else if (!pid) { //child process

            if (pcommands[i]._flag_pipe_in == 1) {  //if there was a pipe to this command
                assert(i > 0);
                assert(pcommands[i-1]._flag_pipe_out == 1);
                assert(pcommands[i-1]._fd_out > STDERR);
                if (dup2(pcommands[i]._fd_in, STDIN) == -1) {
                    perror("Error: \"dup2()\" failed");
                    exit(0);
                }
                close(pcommands[i]._fd_in);
                close(pcommands[i-1]._fd_out);
            }

            if (pcommands[i]._flag_pipe_out == 1) { //if there was a pipe from this command
                assert(i < commands_num - 1);
                assert(pcommands[i+1]._flag_pipe_in == 1);
                assert(pcommands[i+1]._fd_in > STDERR);
                if (dup2(pcommands[i]._fd_out, STDOUT) == -1) {
                    perror("Error: \"dup2()\" failed");
                    exit(0);
                }
                close(pcommands[i]._fd_out);
                close(pcommands[i+1]._fd_in);
            }
            execvp(pcommands[i]._commands[0] , pcommands[i]._commands); //run the command

            perror("Error: \"execvp()\" failed");
            exit(1);
        }
        else
            printf("Child PID %d running\n", (int)pid);
    }

    //closing all the open pipe fd's
    for (int i = 0; i < commands_num; i++) {
        if (pcommands[i]._fd_in != STDIN) { //if there was another stdin that is not 0
            close(pcommands[i]._fd_in);
        }
        if (pcommands[i]._fd_out != STDOUT) { //if there was another stdout that is not 1
            close(pcommands[i]._fd_out);
        }
    }

    int status;
    pid_t corpse;
    while ((corpse = waitpid(-1, &status, 0)) > 0)
        printf("Child PID %d died with status 0x%.4X\n", (int)corpse, status);

    free(pcommands);

    return(0);
}

Just for my knowledge, how would you do it, so it won't get "indisputably messy"?

I'd probably keep the pipe information so that I the child didn't need to worry about the conditionals contained in the asserts (accessing the child information for the child before or after it in the pipeline). If each child only needs to access information in its own data structure, it is cleaner. I'd reorganize the 'struct Command' so it contained two pipes, plus indicators for which pipe contains information that needs closing. In many ways, not radically different from what you've got; just tidier in that child i only needs to look at pcommands[i].

You can see a partial answer in a different context at C Minishell adding pipelines.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, I'll try this things tomorrow. I think ,by quick reading, that the problem is that I don't close the father's fd's right after the fork... (I tried it before, and some error occured... I'll try again) –  hudac Dec 3 '12 at 23:39
1  
Life is a bit more complex than that. In the child processes, you have to close the both ends of the pipe too, and given the way you've organized the data structures that means that child i has to look at the data structures for child i-1 if its input is a pipe (to close the output end of the pipe) and at the data structures for child i+1 if its output is a pipe (to close the input end of the pipe), which is indisputably messy. You also need to close the pipes in the main shell. I reverse engineered your code into an SSCCE (Short, Self-Contained, Correct Example). –  Jonathan Leffler Dec 4 '12 at 0:49
    
Ok thanks, I haven't tried it yet, I'll do it later... I just wanted to ask what is this thing with the SSCCE ? have you done this change? or want me to do it? I didn't understand this part, cause I didn't see a change in the code... –  hudac Dec 4 '12 at 10:13
    
I have got the code available on my machine as an SSCCE; I haven't yet uploaded it to here (I have 'broken' code — compilable but not working like your fragment above; I also have 'fixed' code — with the requisite changes in place). –  Jonathan Leffler Dec 4 '12 at 14:54
    
Thanks, it worked! Just for my knowledge, how whould you do it, so it won't get "indisputably messy" ? I'll appreciate your answer! –  hudac Dec 4 '12 at 20:15

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