Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I found a fun program that allows you to overlay snowflakes over your desktop and windows. As a programming challenge I am interested in trying to figure out how to do this myself. Not to mention that this program is a bit of a memory hog (if it doesn't have a memory leak). Below is the start I have. I am trying to get the basics down with one image and then will expand.

What I would really like help on is making the image move more smoothly and naturally.


Edit:

I posted a solution down below in the answers section but it is more CPU intensive than I would like, any thoughts?


WPF XAML code:

<Window x:Class="MainWindow"
    xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation"
    xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml"
    AllowsTransparency="True"
        WindowStyle="None"
    Title="MainWindow" Height="350" Width="525" Background="Transparent" Topmost="True" WindowState="Maximized" ResizeMode="NoResize">
    <Grid Name="grid1">
        <Image Height="26" HorizontalAlignment="Left" Margin="{Binding flakeMargin}" Name="Image1" Stretch="Fill" VerticalAlignment="Top" Width="28" Source="/snowTest;component/Images/blue-pin-md.png" />
    </Grid>
</Window>

VB Code:

Imports System.ComponentModel

    Class MainWindow
        Dim bw As BackgroundWorker = New BackgroundWorker
        Dim flake0 As New flake

        Private Sub Window_Loaded(sender As System.Object, e As System.Windows.RoutedEventArgs) Handles MyBase.Loaded
            grid1.DataContext = flake0
            AddHandler bw.DoWork, AddressOf backgroundMover
            bw.RunWorkerAsync()
        End Sub

        Private Sub backgroundMover(ByVal sender As Object, ByVal e As System.ComponentModel.DoWorkEventArgs)
            While (True)
                flake0.move()
                System.Threading.Thread.Sleep(100)
            End While
        End Sub
    End Class

Flake Class:

Imports System.ComponentModel

Public Class flake
    Implements INotifyPropertyChanged

    Public Event PropertyChanged As PropertyChangedEventHandler Implements INotifyPropertyChanged.PropertyChanged

    Private Sub NotifyPropertyChanged(ByVal info As String)
        RaiseEvent PropertyChanged(Me, New PropertyChangedEventArgs(info))
    End Sub

    Private Property startLeft As Integer = 300
    Private Property left As Integer = left
    Private Property top As Integer = 100
    Private Property speed As Integer = 1

    Public ReadOnly Property flakeMargin As Thickness
        Get
            Return New Thickness(left, top, 0, 0)
        End Get
    End Property

    Public Sub move()
        top += speed
        left = (Math.Cos(top - 100)) * 6 + startLeft
        NotifyPropertyChanged("flakeMargin")
    End Sub
End Class
share|improve this question
6  
Not sure why this got closed, it seems like a real question to me. My anser would be: Since you are trying to do a per frame animation in WPF you should be using the CompositionTarget.Redering event instead of your own clock. On the rendering event you can call your "draw" code, which would be to move the image around. You probably want to use a canvas instead of a grid as the host element –  Brad Cunningham Dec 3 '12 at 23:36
add comment

2 Answers

Here is my currently proposed solution: What ended up being the biggest correcting factors were that I used the canvas, which allowed me to move in non-integer increments and I also used the cos function more effectively. It is more CPU intensive than I would like (25-30%). Does any one have any ideas on reducing the impact on the CPU?

WPF/XAML:

<Window x:Class="MainWindow"
    xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation"
    xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml"
    AllowsTransparency="True"
        WindowStyle="None"
    Title="MainWindow" Height="350" Width="525" Background="Transparent" Topmost="True" WindowState="Maximized" ResizeMode="NoResize">
    <Canvas Name="canvas1">

    </Canvas>
</Window>

VB.NET Main Window:

Imports System.ComponentModel

Class MainWindow

    Dim bw As New BackgroundWorker
    Dim flakes(17) As flake

    Private Sub Window_Loaded(ByVal sender As System.Object, ByVal e As System.Windows.RoutedEventArgs) Handles MyBase.Loaded
        For i = 0 To flakes.Count - 1
            flakes(i) = New flake
            flakes(i).image.DataContext = flakes(i)
            flakes(i).image.SetBinding(Canvas.LeftProperty, "left")
            flakes(i).image.SetBinding(Canvas.TopProperty, "top")
            canvas1.Children.Add(flakes(i).image)
        Next

        AddHandler bw.DoWork, AddressOf backgroundMover
        bw.RunWorkerAsync()
    End Sub


    Private Sub backgroundMover()
        While (True)
            For Each f In flakes
                f.move()
            Next
            System.Threading.Thread.Sleep(50)
        End While
    End Sub
End Class

VB.Net flake class:

Imports System.ComponentModel

Public Class flake
    Implements INotifyPropertyChanged

    Public Event PropertyChanged As PropertyChangedEventHandler Implements INotifyPropertyChanged.PropertyChanged

    Private Sub NotifyPropertyChanged(ByVal info As String)
        RaiseEvent PropertyChanged(Me, New PropertyChangedEventArgs(info))
    End Sub

    Private Property startLeft As Double
    Private Property _left As Double
    Private Property _top As Double
    Private Property speed As Double
    Private Property amplitude As Double
    Private Property period As Double
    Public Property image As New Image
    Private Shared Property r As New Random

    Public Sub New()
        _image.Width = 28
        _image.Height = 26
        _image.Source = New System.Windows.Media.Imaging.BitmapImage(New Uri("/snowTest;component/Images/blue-pin-md.png", UriKind.Relative))
        startFresh()
    End Sub

    Public ReadOnly Property left As Double
        Get
            Return _left
        End Get
    End Property

    Public ReadOnly Property top As Double
        Get
            Return _top
        End Get
    End Property

    Public Sub startFresh()
        _top = -30
        amplitude = r.Next(5, 35)
        period = 1 / r.Next(20, 60)
        speed = r.Next(15, 25) / 10
        startLeft = r.Next(0, System.Windows.SystemParameters.PrimaryScreenWidth)
    End Sub

    Public Sub move()
        If _top > System.Windows.SystemParameters.PrimaryScreenHeight Then
            startFresh()
        Else
            _top += speed
            _left = amplitude * Math.Cos(period * _top) + startLeft
        End If

        NotifyPropertyChanged("top")
        NotifyPropertyChanged("left")
    End Sub
End Class
share|improve this answer
add comment

Why are you moving it yourself as opposed to using an animation?

If you use WPF's Animation (which is really easy to do in Expression Blend), I think you will get the smoothness you are looking for and you can get some variation in movement, making it more real.

WPF Expression Blend Videos

Basic Animation

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for this recommendation. Through this exercise I have discovered the existence of Expression blend. While it looks neat, I am not particularly interested in purchasing the software at the moment. I will do some research into how to do WPF animation without Expression Blend but of course would be grateful for any suggestions. –  volderArt Dec 4 '12 at 12:14
    
Anything you can do in Blend you can do in pure XAML as well so there is no need to purchase Blend, it's just a GUI to manipulate XAML visually... –  Dean K. Dec 5 '12 at 0:45
    
Yeah, you have to either buy Expression Blend or if you are lucky you get Visual Studio Premium with MSDN (or Ultimate) through your work. For now, you can use the trial. It is totally worth it to use the trial to follow the videos and learn the xaml. –  Rhyous Dec 5 '12 at 6:00
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.