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When running the following query

UPDATE Invoices
SET PaymentTotal = 1
FROM Vendors
WHERE Vendors.VendorID = 34 -- true for some row

SQL Server updates all records in Invoices. However, when the condition does not match any row in the Vendors table:

UPDATE Invoices
SET PaymentTotal = 1
FROM Vendors
WHERE Vendors.VendorID = -34 -- false for all rows

no rows get updated. WHY?

Edit: This is a COMPLETELY academic question and I understand that this is not the ideal way to write queries.

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2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Your original query:

UPDATE Invoices
SET PaymentTotal = 1
FROM Vendors
WHERE Vendors.VendorID = 34

is equivalent to:

update i set paymenttotal = 1
from vendors v
cross join invoices i
where v.vendorid = 34

the cross join returns the product of the two sets and when vendors is reduced to an empty set with the criteria v.vendorid = -34 then the resulting set is empty because anything multiplied by zero is zero.

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This is a completely academic question (I edited the original post to indicate as much) and I understand that this is not the ideal way to write queries. –  JRobinson Dec 4 '12 at 1:30
    
@JonathanRobinson I modified my answer to better explain what you've observed –  gordy Dec 4 '12 at 2:23
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It's because the WHERE clause is evaluated to true in the first case for every value in Invoices (there exists a Vendor whose ID is 34) so every record gets updated and vice versa when ID=-34 -- no records are updated because VendorID=-34 is always false.

For example, let's say we have set Invoices I {... does not matter ... } and Vendors V.VendorIDs {1 .. 35}.

set PaymentTotal = 1 when VendorID=34 exists  
-- 34 exists so this is executed

set PaymentTotal = 1 when VendorID=-34 exists
-- -34 does not exists so this is never executed

These are set operations between unrelated sets so the results won't be expected (without going through this type of analysis).

If you were to relate them (like the query below), then this logic changes and you get "expected" results.


I believe you want something along these lines:

UPDATE Invoices
SET PaymentTotal = 1
FROM Vendors
WHERE Vendors.VendorID = 34 and Invoices.VendorID = Vendors.VendorID

... and I'm assuming you don't actually know the VendorID but rather another Vendor field such that this query makes sense (since there's no use querying another table if you already know the ID).

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This is a completely academic question (I edited the original post to indicate as much) and I understand that this is not the ideal way to write queries. –  JRobinson Dec 4 '12 at 1:30
    
@JonathanRobinson: The first paragraph addresses the academic part but I will expand. –  Austin Salonen Dec 4 '12 at 1:31
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