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I am new to Python and learning about functions. I came across the following function and at my wits end understanding how it works. It seems to me no matter the value of b, the answer should always be six but that isn't the case.

CODE

def mult(a, b):
    if b == 0:
        return 0
    rest = mult(a, b - 1)
    value = a + rest
    return value
print "3 * 2 = ", mult(3, 2)

My understanding of what happens

  1. Since b is not 0 it proceeds
  2. rest is assigned the value 3, 1 and it runs the function again
  3. Since b is 1 and does to equate to 0, it proceeds to rest
  4. rest is assigned the value 3, 0 and it runs the function again
  5. Since b is now zero it returns the value 0
  6. It then proceeds to value which has the value 3 + 3 as a had the value of 3 and rest had the value of 3 i.e. (3,0)
  7. It returns the value 6

But if I assign mult(3,4), it returns the value 12. Following my understanding, that isn't possible. Clearly, I am not understanding the logic flow. What am I doing wrong?

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1  
if you read carefully, it does sum(a for x in range(b)) but recursively... –  JBernardo Dec 4 '12 at 1:03
    
@JBernardo - I know it is recursion but where does sum come in and how does that work. How should I be reading the logic flow? –  PeanutsMonkey Dec 4 '12 at 1:05
    
I've just translated the algorithm to a for loop. Try thinking backwards: The last iteration returns 0, then a, then a+a... until a+a+...+a (number of parcels is b) –  JBernardo Dec 4 '12 at 1:07

5 Answers 5

The basic logic of this function is:

Let's (add a and subtract 1 from b) until b == 0. It might make more sense to you like this:

def mult(a, b):
    value = 0
    while b > 0:
        b = b - 1
        value = value + a
    return value

Only in stead of a while loop, your function keeps calling itself. I managed to contact mult himself and he was willing to explain:

Hi, my name is mult and I'm a Recurser. Recursers are a common breed in Computer Sciencia and we have a special feature; we can clone ourselves. Sadly I was cursed with the inability to multiply. Still, I wanted to live my dream as a multiplier and I did manage to find a way to do it. Here's how:

When you asks me to multiply (a, b), I spawn one clone and ask him (a, b - 1). The clone repeats this process until a clone is spawned that gets asked (a, 0). When that happens (there is a line of myself + b clones then), he answers to the clone that spawned him: 0. That clone in turn adds a to what he was just told (the first time would be 0 + a) and answers this to the clone in front of him. This process repeats until I get answered by the clone I spawned myself. I add a to that and return this as a final answer to you!

def mult(a, b):
    # Should I ask a clone?
    if b == 0:
        # No! I reply 0 to my asker.
        return 0

    # Yes! I spawn a clone and ask him (a, b - 1) and wait for an answer to
    # store in 'rest'
    rest = mult(a, b - 1)

    # I take the answer and add to it the 'a' I was told
    value = a + rest

    # I return the value I calculated to my asker
    return value

print "3 * 2 = ", mult(3, 2)  # Here someone asks me (3, 2)
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It is easier to understand however would like to my head around the logic flow of recursive functions. Never know when I may come across a complex one –  PeanutsMonkey Dec 4 '12 at 1:36
    
I added a section on the recursive logic of the function, I hope this makes it all grockable –  Jesse the Game Dec 4 '12 at 6:58

You can instrument your code to make it easier to see what is happening

def mult(a, b):
    print "mult(%s, %s)"%(a, b)
    if b == 0:
        return 0
    rest = mult(a, b - 1)
    value = a + rest
    print "returns %s"%value
    return value
print "3 * 2 = ", mult(3, 4)

3 * 2 =  mult(3, 4)
mult(3, 3)
mult(3, 2)
mult(3, 1)
mult(3, 0)
returns 3
returns 6
returns 9
returns 12
12

Due to the recursion, the print statements are nested

ie. mult(3, 0) returns 3, mult(3, 1) returns 6, and so on

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Your logic is right until bullet 5. Then at 6 you skip some steps. This is a recursive function. It is easier to understand it by drawing the tree of events on paper, but lets resume your logic first:

mult(3,4):

 1. a = 3, b = 4
 1. rest = mult(3, 3)
 2. a = 3, b = 3
 2. rest = mult(3, 2)
 3. a = 3, b = 2
 3. rest = mult(3, 1)
 4. a = 3, b = 1
 4. rest = mult(3, 0)
 5. a = 3, b = 0
 5. return 0
 4. value = 3 + 0
 4. return 3
 3. value = 3 + 3
 3. return 6
 2. value = 3 + 6
 2. return 9
 1. value = 3 + 9
 1. return 12

In the example above, each number at the beginning of the line represents the step in the recursion. It starts at step 1, goes until step 5 in this case, and then returns 1 by 1 until step 1 again with your final answer.

The function implements the concept of multiplication through sums. For example, 3 * 4 is the same of adding the number '4' three times.

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Thanks. I lost you at where you start the sum of 3 + 0. Why does it reverse in the addition i.e. 4,3,2,1? Also does (3,0) mean 3*0 and so forth and hence value is 3 + (3*0) –  PeanutsMonkey Dec 4 '12 at 1:17
    
The part where I start value = 3 + 0; is reaches b = 0, returns 0 on rest, and then does value = a + rest; Then, the just calculated value return to the previous rest and do again value = a + rest; and so forth. As I said before, recursion is something tricky. Try looking for a video of a teacher doing it in youtube. If you find one where he draws the recursion tree you will get it :) –  KuramaYoko Dec 6 '12 at 16:58
  1. mult() is called with 3, 2 (this is call #1)

  2. which calls mult() with 3, 1 (this is call #2)

  3. which calls mult() with 3, 0 (this is call #3)

  4. which returns 0 (because b was zero) to call #2

  5. call #2 now returns 3 + that 0 to call #1

  6. call #3 now returns 3 + 3

Basically, each invocation is going to increment the a value by a, recursively delving into istelf b times. So, adding 3 to itself 4 times will yield 12.

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Here is a way to visually see how the recursion works:

COUNTER = 0

def mult(a, b):
    global COUNTER

    COUNTER+=1
    print " "*COUNTER + "Called with", a,b

    if b == 0:
        return 0
    rest = mult(a, b - 1)
    value = a + rest

    COUNTER -= 1
    print " "*COUNTER, "Value:", value 

    return value

print "3 * 4 = "
print mult(3, 4)

Output

3 * 4 = 
 Called with 3 4
  Called with 3 3
   Called with 3 2
    Called with 3 1
     Called with 3 0
     Value: 3
    Value: 6
   Value: 9
  Value: 12
12

You can see how the call stack goes all the way down to the bottom (b==0), and then returns values back up the chain to the top.

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