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I'm trying to format math equations vertically using CSS. For example 5,343 + 32 should be formatted as so:

Line 1: 5,343 (right aligned)

Line 2: + (left aligned) 32 (right aligned) --- Note that the plus sign and bottom number are on the same line.

Line 3: ------ (horizontal line)

I've been fooling around with this for the last hour and have had very little luck.

I laid by HTML out like this:

<div id="textbox">
<p class="upperNum">5,343</p>
<p class="sign">+</p>
<p class="lowerNum">32</p>
<p class="line"><hr></p>
</div>
share|improve this question
1  
well, <br> makes a new line –  yentup Dec 4 '12 at 1:48
3  
Not sure a set of <p> tags is the right markup for this... –  BoltClock Dec 4 '12 at 1:49
    
Can you be more specific? You can do all sorts of things using css, line-spacing, or you can just have them all separate divs and position them wherever you want. What exactly are you trying to do? –  yentup Dec 4 '12 at 1:49
    
I'm trying to format simple math equations vertically, like this: www.math-aids.com/images/Addition-Flash-Cards.png –  user1822824 Dec 4 '12 at 1:56
    
I wrote a JavaScript that generates the math problems, I am trying to format the math problems to look like the above image example. –  user1822824 Dec 4 '12 at 1:58

5 Answers 5

up vote 5 down vote accepted

A semantic approach

Here's a semantic approach to marking up an equation that, from the same markup, can be rendered horizontally or vertically by adding a single class. These equations are made up of numbers, an operator, and an equals sign. Here's the markup for an equation:

<span class="equation">
  <span class="number">5,343</span>
  <span class="operator">+</span>
  <span class="number">32</span>
  <span class="equals">=</span>
  <span class="number">5,375</span>
</span>

That alone renders horizontally:

5,343 + 32 = 5,375

With a little CSS, we quickly can transform into a stacked layout. We just add a single stacked class to the equation element:

<span class="equation stacked">
  <span class="number">5,343</span>
  <span class="operator">+</span>
  <span class="number">32</span>
  <span class="equals">=</span>
  <span class="number">5,375</span>
</span>

The following CSS does the magic:

.equation.stacked {
  display: inline-block;
}

.equation.stacked .number {
  display: block;
  margin-left: 1em; /* space for the operator */
  text-align: right;
}

.equation.stacked .operator {
  float: left;
}

.equation.stacked .equals {
  display: block;
  height: 0;
  border-bottom: solid 1px black;
  overflow: hidden;
}

This renders like this:

Stacked equation rendering

Here's a JSBin you can explore: http://jsbin.com/afemaf/1/edit

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, I like that it can easily be turned into a horizontal problem too! –  user1822824 Dec 5 '12 at 6:47
    
Thank you. Awesome solution. –  Aunt Jamaima Oct 6 '13 at 16:02

Do you mean something like this?: http://jsfiddle.net/PkfAU/2/

enter image description here

What you would be doing is using divs, because they are better for creating layouts. Paragraphs are also valid, as the other answer points out, but I find it easier to see with divs. In this case you will need a container div, and three horizontal ones, the second of them being also a container.

.plus and .number are floating inside its container .second, because you need them to use the same horizontal space (all floating elements require a wrapper).

HTML:

<div class="container">
    <div class="first">5,343 </div>
    <div class="second">
        <div class="plus">+</div>
        <div class="number">32</div>
    </div>
    <div class="third">
        <div class="result">5,375</div>
    </div>
</div>

CSS:

.container {
    width:200px;
}

.first,
.second {
    width:200px;
    text-align:right;
    display:table;
}
.plus {
    width:auto;
    float:left;
}
.number {
    width:auto;
    float:right;
}
.third {
    width:200px;
    text-align:right;
    border-top:1px solid black;
}​
share|improve this answer
    
That's exactly what I mean but it looks like the + sign and 32 aren't on the same line in the example link you posted. –  user1822824 Dec 4 '12 at 2:03
    
I think I hadn't pressed update. How about now? jsfiddle.net/PkfAU/2 –  Yisela Dec 4 '12 at 2:04
    
That did the trick. Thank you. –  user1822824 Dec 4 '12 at 2:43

I think this may be your best bet:

HTML:

<div id="textbox">
    <p class="upperNum">5,343</p>
    <p class="lowerNum">
        <span class="operand">32</span>
        <span class="sign">+</span>
    </p>
    <br class="clear" />
    <p class="line"><hr></p>
</div>

CSS:

#textbox { width: 75px; }
.upperNum { text-align: right; }
.operand { float: right; }
.sign { float: left; }
.clear { clear: both; }

Here's a fiddle that shows this effect also:

http://jsfiddle.net/8CPar/

Here, you can contain the bottom line in a paragraph, then give the operator and operand a separate span container that you can float, giving you the desired effect. Then, you add a "clear break" which clears the float, making the horizontal break show correctly.

I hope this helps!

share|improve this answer

There are some fine examples here, but I went through with the effort of making a fiddle so might aswell post it.

You just need to ensure that widths and alignments are set correctly and it should work out.

My JSFiddle Example.

<div id="list">
    <span class="item">5472</span>
    <span class="operator">+</span><span class="item operand">32</span>

    <hr class="divider"/>

    <span class="result">5504</span>
</div>

With css

.list
{
    width:50px;
}

span
{
    display:block;
    margin-left:20px;
    font-family:"Lucida Console", Monaco, monospace;
    width:50px;
}

.operator
{
    float:left;
    width:20px;
    margin-left:0px;
}

.divider
{
    clear:both;
    width:40px;
    margin-left:20px;
}
.operand
{
    float:left;
    width:50px;
}

I also created an example using pre, that uses pre formatted text, so it should still be precise.

share|improve this answer

Classics,

<html>
<head>
    <style type="text/css">
        .textbox
        {
            width: 100px;
        }
        .upperNum
        {
            text-align: right;
            width: 100%;
        }
        .sign
        {
            float: left;
            text-align: left;
        }
        .lowerNum
        {
            text-align: right;
        }
        .secondline
        {
            clear: both;
            width: 100%;
        }
    </style>
</head>
<body>
    <div class="textbox">
        <div class="upperNum">
            5,343
        </div>
        <div class="secondline">
            <div class="sign">
                +
            </div>
            <div class="lowerNum">
                32
            </div>
        </div>
        <div>
            <hr />
        </div>
    </div>
</body>
</html>
share|improve this answer
    
Fixed width is just for test, –  Ala Dec 4 '12 at 2:22

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