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Say I want my program runs under predefined SYSTEM account, instead of the current logon user, do you know any tool that can help?

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For the SYSTEM account, probably making it a service. You can always call your process from there. –  chris Dec 4 '12 at 1:51

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ShellRunas v1.01

You can download it for free here. http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/sysinternals/cc300361.aspx

ShellRunas v.1.0 is a new Sysinternals tools by Mark Russinowich. It enables you to run a program with different credentials from Windows Explorer.

Usage:

     shellrunas [/reg | [/quietreg ] | /regnetonly [/quiet] | unreg | [/netonly] <program> <arguments>
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Here's a post explaining running a CMD prompt as SYSTEM account, using the psexec tool. Like the ShellRunAs tool, psexec was also Mark Russinovich; unlike ShellRunAs, psexec can execute command on remote systems & has more program options.

"run as" command might also work, but I haven't verified it for use with the SYSTEM account. Here's the info for "run as" in 2000 and XP and again for Vista, 7, & 8.

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Is it possible to run as system using this? I didn't think it was. Anyway, the winapi function for that is LogonUser. –  chris Dec 4 '12 at 2:21

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