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I am looking for an example of how a class can call back to a parent form's control using an event. In this case, the event will occur in the class, not the parent. For example if you have a class and something happens in the class that will require a form's textbox to be updated.

I have done this by exposing a form's textbox as a property then passing an instance of the form to the class but this seems like a lot of work just to update a textbox.

I am trying to self teach C# so Im a newbie. Ken

share|improve this question
    
How are you triggering the event? Is it in response to a user action? A timer? At random? You probably don't need an event. – Jeff Mercado Dec 4 '12 at 2:20
public class Form1 : Form
{
    EventClass eventClassInstance;

    public Form()
    {
        eventClassInstance = new EventClass();
        eventClassInstance.actualEvent += new EventClass.CustomEventHandler(eventHandler);
    }

    private void eventHandler(object sender)
    {
        //Do something
    }
}

public class EventClass
{
    public delegate void CustomEventHandler(object sender);
    public CustomEventHandler actualEvent;// This gets fired somewhere

    public EventClass()
    {

    }
}

This is a simple example of an event handler in the parent class.

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You may want to look at this MSDN article on publishing events. Depending on the information that you are wanting to pass you may need to create a Custom EventArgs to pass the information, then create your delegate and event.

Here is a quick and dirty example borrowing heavily on the above MSDN Link, the Timer was added for a quick test:

Form1

public partial class Form1 : Form
{

    public Form1()
    {
        InitializeComponent();
        Class1 myClass = new Class1();
        myClass.RaiseCustomEvent += new EventHandler<CustomEventArgs>(myClass_RaiseCustomEvent);

    }

    void myClass_RaiseCustomEvent(object sender, CustomEventArgs e)
    {
        this.Text = e.Message;
    }

}

Class1

using System.Windows.Forms;
namespace WindowsFormsApplication1
{
    class Class1
    { 
        public event EventHandler<CustomEventArgs> RaiseCustomEvent;
        public Class1()
        {
            Timer tmr = new Timer();
            tmr.Tick += new EventHandler(tmr_Tick);
            tmr.Interval = 2000;
            tmr.Start();
        }

        void tmr_Tick(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {
            CustomEventArgs ea = new CustomEventArgs("Hello World");
            RaiseCustomEvent(this, ea);
        }

    }

    public class CustomEventArgs : EventArgs
    {
        public CustomEventArgs(string s)
        {
            msg = s;
        }
        private string msg;
        public string Message
        {
            get { return msg; }
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Why not use EventHandler<CustomEventArgs>? – Ben Voigt Dec 4 '12 at 2:29
    
@BenVoigt You are right, it would be a lot cleaner. I changed it thanks. – Mark Hall Dec 4 '12 at 2:37
1  
The cast can now go away also. – Ben Voigt Dec 4 '12 at 5:02
    
Thank you for the example! – kenmtb Dec 4 '12 at 20:22
    
I have to take some time to look at all the examples to see how they will apply. My initial request may have been incomplete. To clarify: The code would have a form which would have a "status" textbox. Other classes can update the status box – kenmtb Dec 4 '12 at 20:36

Try to follow this process:

  1. Expose an event in the data class
  2. When the textbox needs updating, fire the event
  3. Listen for the event in the parent form
  4. In the event handler, update the textbox
share|improve this answer
    
Im still new, what would a data class be? – kenmtb Dec 4 '12 at 20:13

Not sure how your class would trigger its update action. So lets consider a simple case, where user would click a button to invoke the class to do something. You can pass the callback from the form to the class as following:

public partial class Form1 : Form
{
    public Form1()
    {
        InitializeComponent();
    }

    private void button1_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        Class1 class1 = new Class1();
        class1.DoSomething(OnSuccess, OnError);
    }

    private void OnSuccess(string newValue)
    {
        textBox1.Text = newValue;
    }

    private void OnError(Exception ex)
    {
        MessageBox.Show(ex.Message, "Error", MessageBoxButtons.OK, MessageBoxIcon.Error);
    }
}

The class would finish its task and pass the updated value to the callback, with no knowledge about how the caller would do to the updated value:

public class Class1
{
    public void DoSomething(Action<string> onSuccess, Action<Exception> onError)
    {
        try
        {
            // Logic to really do something...

            if (onSuccess != null)
                onSuccess("updated value");
        }
        catch (Exception ex)
        {
            if (onError != null)
                onError(ex);
        }
    }
}

If you have learnt lambda expression, you can pass the call back to your class on the fly:

private void button1_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    Class1 class1 = new Class1();
    class1.DoSomething(
        newValue => textBox1.Text = newValue,
        ex => MessageBox.Show(ex.Message, "Error", MessageBoxButtons.OK, MessageBoxIcon.Error));
}
share|improve this answer
    
This is interesting. I have a LOT to learn regarding C#. It looks like you are using a function that belongs to a parent in the child class. Is it OK to call back to the parent? Thanks – kenmtb Dec 4 '12 at 20:18
    
Sorry I can't quite catch your question. you are using a function that belongs to a parent in the child class Yes, and this is a call back to the "parent". – Fung Dec 5 '12 at 2:11

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