Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I use getopts to obtain a MAC address and grep that MAC address through log files. It looks like this:

#!/bin/bash

while getopts ":m:hx:" opt; do
  case $opt in
    m)
        cat /var/log/vmlog/Verimatrix.log | grep $OPTARG | grep VCAS080455
        cat /var/log/vmlog/Verimatrix.log | grep $OPTARG | grep VCAS080285
        cat /var/log/vmlog/Verimatrix.log | grep $OPTARG | grep VCAS080290
      ;;
    h)
        echo "./search_mac.sh -m <mac address> will filter the logs by mac address"
        echo "./search_mac.sh -h will print this message"
      ;;
    \?)
      echo "Invalid option: -$OPTARG" >&2
      ;;
  esac
done

I want to export the result to a file when the -x option is used:

./search_mac.sh -m 00067B6D87F0 -x /home/nico/extract.txt

I don't understand at this point how to obtain the argument from -x to be into my m) part of my case.

A little help would be great.

Thanks

share|improve this question
1  
You win a UUOC (Useless Use of Cat) Award. Three times! Why not: grep "$OPTARG" /var/log/vmlog/Verimatrix.log | grep -E 'VCAS080455|VCAS080285|VCAS080290' so you only scan the log file once. You could reduce the second grep to grep -E 'VCAS080(455|285|290)' without straining the brain cells too hard. –  Jonathan Leffler Dec 4 '12 at 2:54

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I think the best approach is to save the values of the option-arguments in shell variables, and then run your commands at the end:

#!/bin/bash

m_arg=
x_arg=

while getopts ":m:hx:" opt; do
  case $opt in
    m) m_arg="$OPTARG" ;;
    x) x_arg="$OPTARG" ;;
    h)
        echo "./search_mac.sh -m <mac address> will filter the logs by mac address"
        echo "./search_mac.sh -h will print this message"
        exit 0
      ;;
    \?)
      echo "Invalid option: -$OPTARG" >&2
      exit 1
      ;;
  esac
done

if [[ "$x_arg" ]] ; then
    exec > "$x_arg"          # redirect STDOUT to argument of -x
fi

< /var/log/vmlog/Verimatrix.log grep -- "$m_arg" | grep VCAS080455
< /var/log/vmlog/Verimatrix.log grep -- "$m_arg" | grep VCAS080285
< /var/log/vmlog/Verimatrix.log grep -- "$m_arg" | grep VCAS080290

That said . . . this option doesn't seem all that useful to me, since -x /home/nico/extract.txt would just mean the same thing as > /home/nico/extract.txt. Am I missing something?

share|improve this answer
    
Hi thanks for the quick answer. I'm still a noob at bash. I'm not quite sure how the redirect works in your example. Is it a typo or should there be $x_arg in front of your redirect such as it would be : $x_arg < /var/log/vmlog/Verimatrix.log grep -- "$m_arg" | grep VCAS080455 ? –  ndefontenay Dec 4 '12 at 2:43
    
The exec notation with no command and only I/O redirection means that from that point in the script onwards, the I/O redirection is changed. In this case, anything that writes to standard output will now have its output go to whatever is in $x_arg (/home/nico/extract.txt). –  Jonathan Leffler Dec 4 '12 at 2:51
    
Thanks again :) You are correct ultimately what I want is just > <some path to a file> But that file would be variable and that's why it's a parameter. I just don't know any better way... Yet. –  ndefontenay Dec 4 '12 at 2:56
    
Note that you can do: file=/home/nico/extract.txt; ./search_mac.sh -m 00067B6D87F0 > $file. That is, the file name in a redirection can be specified by a variable. –  Jonathan Leffler Dec 4 '12 at 3:02

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.