Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

So, my app needs to perform an action almost continuously (with a pause of 10 seconds or so between each run) for as long as the app is running or a cancellation is requested. The work it needs to do has the possibility of taking up to 30 seconds.

Is it better to use a System.Timers.Timer and use AutoReset to make sure it doesn't perform the action before the previous "tick" has completed.

Or should I use a general Task in LongRunning mode with a cancellation token, and have a regular infinite while loop inside it calling the action doing the work with a 10 second Thread.Sleep between calls? As for the async/await model, I'm not sure it would be appropriate here as I don't have any return values from the work.

CancellationTokenSource wtoken;
Task task;

void StopWork()
{
    wtoken.Cancel();

    try 
    {
        task.Wait();
    } catch(AggregateException) { }
}

void StartWork()
{
    wtoken = new CancellationTokenSource();

    task = Task.Factory.StartNew(() =>
    {
        while (true)
        {
            wtoken.Token.ThrowIfCancellationRequested();
            DoWork();
            Thread.Sleep(10000);
        }
    }, wtoken, TaskCreationOptions.LongRunning);
}

void DoWork()
{
    // Some work that takes up to 30 seconds but isn't returning anything.
}

or just use a simple timer while using its AutoReset property, and call .Stop() to cancel it?

share|improve this question
    
Task seems like an overkill considering what you're trying to achieve. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/KISS_principle. Stop timer at start of OnTick(), check a bool to see whether you should be doing anything on not, do work, restart Timer when you're done. –  Mike Trusov Dec 4 '12 at 3:20

3 Answers 3

up vote 20 down vote accepted

I'd use TPL Dataflow for this (since you're using .NET 4.5 and it uses Task internally). You can easily create an ActionBlock<TInput> which posts items to itself after it's processed it's action and waited an appropriate amount of time.

First, create a factory that will create your never-ending task:

ITargetBlock<DateTimeOffset> CreateNeverEndingTask(
    Action<DateTimeOffset> action, CancellationToken cancellationToken)
{
    // Validate parameters.
    if (action == null) throw new ArgumentNullException("action");

    // Declare the block variable, it needs to be captured.
    ActionBlock<DateTimeOffset> block = null;

    // Create the block, it will call itself, so
    // you need to separate the declaration and
    // the assignment.
    // Async so you can wait easily when the
    // delay comes.
    block = new ActionBlock<DateTimeOffset>(async now => {
        // Perform the action.
        action(now);

        // Wait.
        await Task.Delay(TimeSpan.FromSeconds(10), cancellationToken).
            // Doing this here because synchronization context more than
            // likely *doesn't* need to be captured for the continuation
            // here.  As a matter of fact, that would be downright
            // dangerous.
            ConfigureAwait(false);

        // Post the action back to the block.
        block.Post(DateTimeOffset.Now);
    }, new ExecutionDataflowBlockOptions { 
        CancellationToken = cancellationToken
    });

    // Return the block.
    return block;
}

I've chosen the ActionBlock<TInput> to take a DateTimeOffset structure; you have to pass a type parameter, and it might as well pass some useful state (you can change the nature of the state, if you want).

Also, note that the ActionBlock<TInput> by default processes only one item at a time, so you're guaranteed that only one action will be processed (meaning, you won't have to deal with reentrancy when it calls the Post extension method back on itself).

I've also passed the CancellationToken structure to both the constructor of the ActionBlock<TInput> and to the Task.Delay method call; if the process is cancelled, the cancellation will take place at the first possible opportunity.

From there, it's an easy refactoring of your code to store the ITargetBlock<DateTimeoffset> interface implemented by ActionBlock<TInput> (this is the higher-level abstraction representing blocks that are consumers, and you want to be able to trigger the consumption through a call to the Post extension method):

CancellationTokenSource wtoken;
ActionBlock<DateTimeOffset> task;

Your StartWork method:

void StartWork()
{
    // Create the token source.
    wtoken = new CancellationTokenSource();

    // Set the task.
    task = CreateNeverEndingTask(now => DoWork(), wtoken.Token);

    // Start the task.  Post the time.
    task.Post(DateTimeOffset.Now);
}

And then your StopWork method:

void StopWork()
{
    // CancellationTokenSource implements IDisposable.
    using (wtoken)
    {
        // Cancel.  This will cancel the task.
        wtoken.Cancel();
    }

    // Set everything to null, since the references
    // are on the class level and keeping them around
    // is holding onto invalid state.
    wtoken = null;
    task = null;
}

Why would you want to use TPL Dataflow here? A few reasons:

Separation of concerns

The CreateNeverEndingTask method is now a factory that creates your "service" so to speak. You control when it starts and stops, and it's completely self-contained. You don't have to interweave state control of the timer with other aspects of your code. You simply create the block, start it, and stop it when you're done.

More efficient use of threads/tasks/resources

The default scheduler for the blocks in TPL data flow is the same for a Task, which is the thread pool. By using the ActionBlock<TInput> to process your action, as well as a call to Task.Delay, you're yielding control of the thread that you were using when you're not actually doing anything. Granted, this actually leads to some overhead when you spawn up the new Task that will process the continuation, but that should be small, considering you aren't processing this in a tight loop (you're waiting ten seconds between invocations).

If the DoWork function actually can be made awaitable (namely, in that it returns a Task), then you can (possibly) optimize this even more by tweaking the factory method above to take a Func<DateTimeOffset, CancellationToken, Task> instead of an Action<DateTimeOffset>, like so:

ITargetBlock<DateTimeOffset> CreateNeverEndingTask(
    Func<DateTimeOffset, CancellationToken, Task> action, 
    CancellationToken cancellationToken)
{
    // Validate parameters.
    if (action == null) throw new ArgumentNullException("action");

    // Declare the block variable, it needs to be captured.
    ActionBlock<DateTimeOffset> block = null;

    // Create the block, it will call itself, so
    // you need to separate the declaration and
    // the assignment.
    // Async so you can wait easily when the
    // delay comes.
    block = new ActionBlock<DateTimeOffset>(async now => {
        // Perform the action.  Wait on the result.
        await action(now, cancellationToken).
            // Doing this here because synchronization context more than
            // likely *doesn't* need to be captured for the continuation
            // here.  As a matter of fact, that would be downright
            // dangerous.
            ConfigureAwait(false);

        // Wait.
        await Task.Delay(TimeSpan.FromSeconds(10), cancellationToken).
            // Same as above.
            ConfigureAwait(false);

        // Post the action back to the block.
        block.Post(DateTimeOffset.Now);
    }, new ExecutionDataflowBlockOptions { 
        CancellationToken = cancellationToken
    });

    // Return the block.
    return block;
}

Of course, it would be good practice to weave the CancellationToken through to your method (if it accepts one), which is done here.

That means you would then have a DoWorkAsync method with the following signature:

Task DoWorkAsync(CancellationToken cancellationToken);

You'd have to change (only slightly, and you're not bleeding out separation of concerns here) the StartWork method to account for the new signature passed to the CreateNeverEndingTask method, like so:

void StartWork()
{
    // Create the token source.
    wtoken = new CancellationTokenSource();

    // Set the task.
    task = CreateNeverEndingTask((now, ct) => DoWorkAsync(ct), wtoken.Token);

    // Start the task.  Post the time.
    task.Post(DateTimeOffset.Now, wtoken.Token);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Hello, I am trying this implementation but I am facing issues. If my DoWork takes no argument, task = CreateNeverEndingTask(now => DoWork(), wtoken.Token); gives me a build error (type mismatch). On the other hand, if my DoWork takes a DateTimeOffset parameter, that same line gives me a different build error, telling me that no overload for DoWork takes 0 arguments. Would you please help me figure this one out? –  Bovaz Aug 29 at 6:14
    
Actually, I solved my issue by adding a cast to the line where I assign task and passing the parameter to DoWork: task = (ActionBlock<DateTimeOffset>)CreateNeverEndingTask(now => DoWork(now), wtoken.Token); –  Bovaz Aug 29 at 15:39

I find the new Task-based interface to be very simple for doing things like this - even easier than using the Timer class.

There are some small adjustments you can make to your example. Instead of:

task = Task.Factory.StartNew(() =>
{
    while (true)
    {
        wtoken.Token.ThrowIfCancellationRequested();
        DoWork();
        Thread.Sleep(10000);
    }
}, wtoken, TaskCreationOptions.LongRunning);

You can do this:

task = Task.Factory.StartNew(async () =>  // <- marked async
{
    while (true)
    {
        DoWork();
        await Task.Delay(10000, wtoken.Token); // <- await with cancellation
    }
}, wtoken.Token);

This way the cancellation will happen instantaneously if inside the Task.Delay, rather than having to wait for the Thread.Sleep to finish.

Also, using Task.Delay over Thread.Sleep means you aren't tying up a thread doing nothing for the duration of the sleep.

If you're able, you can also make DoWork() accept a cancellation token, and the cancellation will be much more responsive.

share|improve this answer

If I were you I would create a new thread and in a "while not terminated" loop would do whatever I need to do and then sleep for 10 secs. no need for timers and complex logic...

share|improve this answer
    
Go a more low level: override void WndProc(ref Message m) –  Jeremy Thompson Dec 4 '12 at 3:28
    
Could you elaborate on just how to do that? IMO, this is nothing more than a comment, not an answer. –  casperOne Dec 4 '12 at 22:18

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.