Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I have a Service, in which I wish to do a series of intensive tasks (uploading bitmaps to some server)

Assuming the upload function is

uploadImage(Bitmap bitmap);

WHat is the best approach for this?

At first I did it like thus (bearing in mind there could be a dozen or so elements of array ImageMakers):

for (MyImageMaker mim : ImageMakers){
      uploadImage(mim.getImage());
}

My reasoning was, that since I'm not using the UI thread I don't need to put this series of intensive tasks on another thread. But then I thought maybe I should use a ThreadPoolExecutor, to speed things up a bit.

  ThreadPoolExecutor executor = (ThreadPoolExecutor)Executors.newFixedThreadPool(5);//5 is arbitrary
   for (MyImageMaker mim : ImageMakers){

 executor.execute(new Runnable(){
      public void run(){
        uploadImage(mim.getImage());
     } 
     }   
  }

My first questions is, is this a good idea?

Then I thought I want to call some other function after the last image is uploaded. Using a ThreadPoolExecutor, what is the best way to do this?

Not knowing the best way, I settled for an AsyncTask.

 private class MyTask extends AsyncTask<Void,Void,Void>{


      protected Void doInBackground(Void... arg0) {

          for (MyImageMaker mim : ImageMakers){
                    uploadImage(mim.getImage());
             }


    }

    @Override
    protected void onPostExecute(Void v) {
        anotherFunction();//needs to be called after all images uploaded

    }
}

I would like to know which technique is best. Or if there is a better way to do a series of intensive tasks in a Service.

share|improve this question
1  
"My reasoning was, that since I'm not using the UI thread" - An Android Service runs on the main (UI) thread and will block with the potential of an ANR. Using AsyncTask in a Service is basically pointless as all methods (except doInBackground(...)) are designed to interact with the UI (not possible with a Service). Use an IntentService as Ponyets suggests - an IntentService manages its own worker thread and self-terminates when finished. –  Squonk Dec 4 '12 at 4:05
    
@Squonk - You are correct. So do yuo suggest I do a simple loop in an IntentService? –  user485498 Dec 4 '12 at 4:09
    
That would work depending on your requirements. I use an IntentService the other way around - I need to download a number of files and pass a list of URLs which my IntentService loops through. The IntentService is either called by an AlarmManager alarm (possibly when the device is asleep) and generates a Notification on completion. It can also be triggered manually from an Activity which creates and passes a ResultReceiver to get interactive feedback. There are a number of ways of doing it but IntentService is a useful and powerful class. –  Squonk Dec 4 '12 at 4:19
    
OK I think I understand. –  user485498 Dec 4 '12 at 10:15

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I think IntentService is a better way.

protected void onHandleIntent(){
    for (MyImageMaker mim : ImageMakers){
        uploadImage(mim.getImage());
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
But should I use a ThreadPoolExecutor to make it more efficient? –  user485498 Dec 4 '12 at 3:31
    
Use ThreadPoolExecutor may be more efficient. ThreadPoolExecutor would be better than AsyncTask, cause AsyncTasks on system before 1.6 or after 3.0 run in series. –  Ponyets Dec 4 '12 at 8:37

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.