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I'm looking on 'developer.android.com' to scale down my bitmap file and I found one thing that I don't understand. so I appreciate you give me a little help.

Here's a snippet from developer.android.com

public static int calculateInSampleSize(
        BitmapFactory.Options options, int reqWidth, int reqHeight) {
  // Raw height and width of image
  final int height = options.outHeight;
  final int width = options.outWidth;
  int inSampleSize = 1;

  if (height > reqHeight || width > reqWidth) {
    if (width > height) {
      inSampleSize = Math.round((float)height / (float)reqHeight);
    } else {
      inSampleSize = Math.round((float)width / (float)reqWidth);
    }
  }
  return inSampleSize;
}

in if statement, when " if(width > height)" why do they calculate "(float)height / (float)reqHeight " ?

for example, width=600, height=800, reqWidth=100, reqHeight=100.

In this situation, inSampleSize would be 6 and the dimensions calculated are width=100, height=133. height is still above reqHeight..

so, can anyone explain me about this, please? sorry for complicated explanation but I hope someone give me a idea. :)

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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

All I can say is that their logic looks wrong :( Anyway this method is fairly simple so it shouldn't be that much of a problem for you to reimplement it with the correct conditions ! I mean when you take a look at decodeSampledBitmapFromResource, it only wants to reduce the Bitmap to make it fit into the desired bounds, so this has to be an error.

EDIT :: That looks even worse as to me it won't work for some cases. Let's say you have width = 200 and height = 600. You set your max bounds at width = 100 and height = 500. You have height > width, yet if you want them both to fit the return result inSampleSize has to be 200/100 and not 600/500. So basically if you reimplement the method, I would do it this way :

public static int calculateInSampleSize(
            BitmapFactory.Options options, int reqWidth, int reqHeight) {
    // Raw height and width of image
    final int height = options.outHeight;
    final int width = options.outWidth;

    int stretch_width = Math.round((float)width / (float)reqWidth);
    int stretch_height = Math.round((float)height / (float)reqHeight);

    if (stretch_width <= stretch_height) 
        return stretch_height;
    else 
        return stretch_width;
}

But that looks like too many issues with their code for me to believe I understood its point correctly !

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Thx! so their logic seems to be wrong..! –  user1874389 Dec 6 '12 at 16:31

Well, after having many problems with the scaling-stuff I think i got my own answer:

Using "Loading Large Bitmaps Efficiently" from http://developer.android.com/training/displaying-bitmaps/load-bitmap.html I want to post some of my results (Original Code below):

// Calculate ratios of height and width to requested height and width
final int heightRatio = Math.round((float) height / (float) reqHeight);
final int widthRatio = Math.round((float) width / (float) reqWidth);

I am currently working on my Galaxy-Tab 7.7 with 1280 x 752 resolution in landscape mode. Imagine an Image with the following specs:

1920 x 1200 .. what will happen?

heighRatio = 1920/1280 = 1.5 and widthRatio = 1200/752 = 1.59

Both numbers get roundet to 2 so the Image will be scaled down by the factor 2 if i understand everything right. This will result in the Image to be 1920/2 = 960 * 600 which is less then my requiered Resolution of 1280 * 752.

I solved this with replacing round by floor:

// Calculate ratios of height and width to requested height and width
final int heightRatio = (int)Math.floor((float) height / (float) reqHeight);
final int widthRatio = (int)Math.floor((float) width / (float) reqWidth);

This actually prevents some of my images get scaled down too much. I am currently still investigating the parameter inSampleSize to see if using "fractions" would be an option. Currently all Images up to the size of 1280x752 (*2) = 2560*1504 will not get scaled. The imageView I am writing this is an detailed view of the image so it should not be too much of an issue right now.

I use the modified version of the in code in conjunction with:

returnview.setAdjustViewBounds(true);

This will prevent images larger then my screen to get a messed up bounding box. You can see it if you set an color-backround to the actual image. Furthermore with the now fixed code I can implement some onClick Handler to detect if the user clicks outside of my image to close the image.

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I find their logic

if (height > reqHeight || width > reqWidth) {
    if (width > height) {
        inSampleSize = Math.round((float)height / (float)reqHeight);
    } else {
        inSampleSize = Math.round((float)width / (float)reqWidth);
    }
}

confusing too. I would take a simpler approach. My logic is scales the image on width if it is horizontal image and ignores the required height, scales the image on height if it is vertical image and ignores the required width.

if (height > reqHeight || width > reqWidth) {
        if (width > height) {
            inSampleSize = Math.round((float) width / (float) reqWidth);
        } else {
            inSampleSize = Math.round((float) height / (float) reqHeight);
        }
    }
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