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I was looking for info on foreign keys.... AGAIN!!!... and happened to notice on webschools.com they have different examples of the same thing. for the foreign key example they have

CREATE TABLE Orders
(
O_Id int NOT NULL,
OrderNo int NOT NULL,
P_Id int,
PRIMARY KEY (O_Id),
FOREIGN KEY (P_Id) REFERENCES Persons(P_Id)
)

CREATE TABLE Orders
(
O_Id int NOT NULL PRIMARY KEY,
OrderNo int NOT NULL,
P_Id int FOREIGN KEY REFERENCES Persons(P_Id)
)

CREATE TABLE Orders
(
O_Id int NOT NULL,
OrderNo int NOT NULL,
P_Id int,
PRIMARY KEY (O_Id),
CONSTRAINT fk_PerOrders FOREIGN KEY (P_Id)
REFERENCES Persons(P_Id)
)

now..........

what's the difference?...

How do I know which one I'm suppose to use for my database? I have a feeling this will help resolve a lot of the confusion I'm having with sql... lol

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First of all you need to know what you are up to do? I mean what attributes do you need. There might be many examples but all these are just for test and these have different purposes –  polin Dec 4 '12 at 4:58
    
You should accept answers (by clicking the hollow tick to the left of the answer you like the best) to questions you ask (to date, you haven't accepted any) –  Bohemian Dec 4 '12 at 18:43

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

No difference in effect: They achieve exactly the same thing.

I prefer the in-line version, because it puts the fk definition as close to the column definition as possible.

There's a 3rd way - a separate alter table statement (which I think is the "official" way):

alter table orders
add contraint fk_PerOrders 
foreign key p_id references persons(p_id);

You may find some databases don't support one version or the other.

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thanks! but still, I figured they do the same thing, but what are those different methods called? Why do they exist? I'm just wondering because I don't know SQL all that well yet and while looking at different tutorials I just see "SQL Syntax"... it didn't hit me until now that there were 3 different kinds.. lol. I need to figure out which one works with what I use. –  DaMighty Optiq Dec 4 '12 at 5:09

All of them are doing same thing. Use the one which you feel is easy to understand.

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All do same (three ways):

  • In first, you first defined P_Id as int then defined foreign key constraint.
  • In second, P_Id int FOREIGN KEY REFERENCES Persons(P_Id). P_Id is defecation and foreign key constraint defecation in same line.

  • In third, a foreign key constraint name is also give fk_PerOrders. that can be useful later when you wants to drop constraint. e.g.

ALTER TABLE Orders
DROP FOREIGN KEY fk_PerOrders

Its always good practice to give name to a constraint.

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may be you are talking about this site their written clearly. –  Grijesh Chauhan Dec 4 '12 at 5:08

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