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i have a bash script like this:

#!/bin/bash
# ALL HTML FILES
FILES="*.html"
# for loop read each file
for f in $FILES
do
INF="$f"
OUTF="$f.out.tmp"
# replace javascript
sed '/<!--fff309/,/<!--\/fff309-->/d' $INF > $OUTF
/bin/cp $OUTF $INF
/bin/rm -f $OUTF
done

the html is look like this:

<html>
<body>
<div>some normal html code</div><!--fff309-->some javascript code goes here... <!--/fff309-->

<div>
some other html....
</div>
</body>
</html>

the bash script work, however it remove all the html part below the <!--/fff309-->

so it become:

<html>
<body>
<div>some normal html code</div>

is there anyway to do so that it only remove the part:

<!--fff309--> ...  <!--/fff309-->

Thanks

share|improve this question
1  
That sed script works fine on my system (with GNU sed version 4.2.1). What does sed --version report on your system? –  ruakh Dec 4 '12 at 6:25
    
Also OK on Mac OS X (BSD non-GNU, there is no -version or --version –  Matteo Dec 4 '12 at 6:27
    
sed --version GNU sed version 4.2.1 –  Redbox Dec 4 '12 at 6:27
    
this is my OS: Linux abc.com 2.6.32-279.14.1.el6.x86_64 #1 SMP Tue Nov 6 23:43:09 UTC 2012 x86_64 x86_64 x86_64 GNU/Linux –  Redbox Dec 4 '12 at 6:30
    
have you tried adding -e after sed? –  Rubens Dec 4 '12 at 6:31
show 6 more comments

2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

May be you can use perl inplace replacement for this as below: i had changed your script as below to make it more simple.

#!/bin/bash
# ALL HTML FILES
FILES="*.html"
# for loop read each file
for f in $FILES
do
perl -i -lne 'print unless(/\<\!--fff309--\>/.../\<\!--\/fff309--\>/)' $f
done

Main task is done by the line:

perl -i -lne 'print unless(/\<\!--fff309--\>/.../\<\!--\/fff309--\>/)'

This does change the file directly witout having a need to create a temporary file. I testted it and the command works for me.

Also if you insist on using sed the below works for me:

sed '/\<\!--fff309--\>/,/\<\!--\/fff309--\>/d' your_file

for your case it would be better to use -i option of sed which does in place replacement as below.

sed -i '/\<\!--fff309--\>/,/\<\!--\/fff309--\>/d' your_file

so using this your script will be changed to as below:

#!/bin/bash
# ALL HTML FILES
FILES="*.html"
# for loop read each file
for f in $FILES
do
sed '/\<\!--fff309--\>/,/\<\!--\/fff309--\>/d' $f
done

After looking at the HTML file:

this is the thing that you need:

perl -pi -e 's/\<\!--fff309--\>.*\<\!--\/fff309--\>//g' your_file

so your script becomes:

#!/bin/bash
# ALL HTML FILES
FILES="*.html"
# for loop read each file
for f in $FILES
do
perl -pi -e 's/\<\!--fff309--\>.*\<\!--\/fff309--\>//g' $f
done
share|improve this answer
    
same problem, it remove all the text below it.. check the original html here: pastebin.com/jpLf5L7j –  Redbox Dec 4 '12 at 7:05
    
sed -i '/\<\!--fff309--\>/,/\<\!--\/fff309--\>/d' does not remove anynthing.. but this will: sed -i '/<\!--fff309-->/,/<\!--\/fff309-->/d' however it remove all part below it. –  Redbox Dec 4 '12 at 7:12
    
I checked your html file.i see both FFF309's are in the same line.but your question says that they are on different lines.So change your question.i am downvoting your question since it is wrongly framed.And this is the reason why all the lines below the first find of FFF309 will be removed with the regex. –  Vijay Dec 4 '12 at 7:13
    
sorry, i dont know about that.. what is the solution for that? i just want that part to be removed –  Redbox Dec 4 '12 at 7:17
    
I have updated my answer.check the latest update. –  Vijay Dec 4 '12 at 7:20
show 2 more comments

The problem is not on your sed, but in your bash script. Remove the double quotes from "*.html".

Bash consider double quoted strings as an unique string, i. e., it won't separate the string using the value of IFS, neither expand your wildcards, avoiding, thus, the f variable on your script to be simply a <name>.html, and forcing it to be *.html.

If you echo the different results, you'll notice that, with double quotes, the variable f will be *.html, and when you echo it, the expansion will be performed, so that you'll have: <name_1>.html <name_2>.html ... <name_n>.html.

For example,

  • create two or more .html files in your directory;
  • execute the following script:

    #!/bin/bash
    
    echo "Incorrect:"    
    for i in "*.html"; do
        echo $i;
    done
    
    echo "Correct:"
    for i in *.html; do
        echo $i;
    done
    

Try the following:

#!/bin/bash
# ALL HTML FILES
FILES=*.html
# for loop read each file
for f in $FILES
do
INF=$f
OUTF=$f.out.tmp
# replace javascript
sed '/<!--fff309/,/<!--\/fff309-->/d' $INF > $OUTF
/bin/cp $OUTF $INF
/bin/rm -f $OUTF
done
share|improve this answer
    
i removed. now become this: FILES=*.html, still got the same problem –  Redbox Dec 4 '12 at 6:55
    
have you tried to use *.html directly in the script, just to check if the problem persists –  Rubens Dec 4 '12 at 7:00
    
@Redbox I've tried to rewrite the .sh, with alterations; see my edit. –  Rubens Dec 4 '12 at 7:11
    
your code work, but it still remove all part below the <!--/fff309--> –  Redbox Dec 4 '12 at 7:15
    
edited the question, the fff309 part is same line. sorry if that cause the problem? –  Redbox Dec 4 '12 at 7:20
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