Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Let's say i have a 2 D array int m[3][4] If the typedef is defined as

typedef int array[4];
array *ptr = m;

What does this mean? Is it pointer to array of 4 elements. Or array of 4 pointers?

When we cout << ptr or cout << *ptr, It prints the same address. How is that possible?

share|improve this question
    
ptr is a pointer to array of 4 –  nhahtdh Dec 4 '12 at 6:39
    
cout << ptr or cout << *ptr; But are printing address on my ubuntu system. But when I run the same code on codepad.org *ptr printf [1,2,3,4]; (m is a array of 4 ints {1,2,3,4} can any body explain this difference in the output –  YS. Dec 4 '12 at 12:15

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

ptr is pointer to an array of four elements of type int. m is an array of 3 elements of type (of array of four elements of type int). To give you a picture - m is an array of 3 elements of type array. And that is the reason when ptr is initialized to m - there is no problem because 'm' being an array is implicitly converted to pointer to first element in that array.

ptr is pointer to an array of elements. So that pointer is printed. And when *ptr is used - you get an array which again get's implicitly converted to pointer to the first element of the array, which again is the same starting point - so you get the same value.

As everything starts at the same point you are getting the same value. Thing will start differentiating when one does ++ on pointers. I will leave you with that.

share|improve this answer

Check out the clockwise/spiral rule. After reading this you can read the declaration as being a pointer to the type-alias array, in other words a pointer to an array of four integers.

share|improve this answer

As per "clockwise/spiral rule" ptr is a pointer to array of 4 int.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.