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Why is this not working??

    var sheep = function(options){
        this.options = {sizes: 100,
                        eat: 100,
                 colors: 'white', 
                 running: function () {
                     return this.sizes + this.eat;
                 }
          }
    };

    var blacksheep = new sheep({colors:'black'});       

    alert('blackcsheep color is ' + blacksheep.colors);//error undefined
    alert('blackcsheep color is ' + blacksheep.options.colors);// it return white
    alert('blackcsheep running is ' + blacksheep.running());//error
share|improve this question
1  
sheep is already an object. I think reading about JavaScript basics would help you the most: MDN JavaScript Guide, especially Working with Objects. –  Felix Kling Dec 4 '12 at 6:42
    
@FatDogMark: What do you want exactly. sheep is already an object. –  karthick Dec 4 '12 at 6:42
    
but how do i make another black sheep base on the sheep? to inherit the properties of sheep –  FatDogMark Dec 4 '12 at 6:42
    
js is a prototype based language, so to say, so that your sheep can't be used as a class. you rather copy the sheep (this is not the real way you can do it in js but only the idea): blacksheep = sheep; blacksheep.color = 'black'; and you are done more or less. –  ShinTakezou Dec 4 '12 at 6:43
3  
@ShinTakezou: blacksheep = sheep would not create a copy of sheep, both variables just refer to the same object. This has nothing to do with prototypal inheritance. –  Felix Kling Dec 4 '12 at 6:44

7 Answers 7

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The syntax:

var sheep = {sizes:100, eat:100, colors:'white',running:function(){
        return this.sizes+this.eat;
        }
    };

is an object literal. It defines an instance of an object, but not the class that defines it. Therefore, there is no way to "new-up" another instance of the object.

Take a look at jQuery's extend functionality:

var blacksheep = {
}

$.extend(blacksheep, sheep, { color: black });

This will copy all the properties of sheep into blacksheep, then merge the third parameter into blacksheep, effectively achieving what you want.

share|improve this answer
    
$.extend is just convenience for me, alright I accept the answer –  FatDogMark Dec 8 '12 at 3:45

To make another black sheep based on sheep, in this scenario you could do (using jQuery):

var blacksheep = $.extend(sheep, { color: 'black' });
share|improve this answer
1  
And without jQuery? –  Felix Kling Dec 4 '12 at 6:47
    
I wouldn't do it this way without jQuery. Cloning objects is messy - an example with function Sheep() {...} should be used. Reference stackoverflow.com/questions/728360/… for cloning javascript objects. –  Richard Rout Dec 4 '12 at 6:50

You can create a sheep object like this.

 function Sheep(sizes,eat,colors){
    this.sizes = sizes;
    this.eat = eat;
    this.colors = colors;
    this.running = function (){
     return this.sizes+this.eat;
    }

    }

Alternatively you can write like this also

 function Sheep(sizes,eat,colors){
    this.sizes = sizes;
    this.eat = eat;
    this.colors = colors;        
    }
 sheep.prototype.running = function(){
 return this.sizes + this.eat;    
}

var sheep1 = new Sheep('100','100','white');

share|improve this answer
var sheep = function(){
    this.sizes = 100;
    this.eat = 100;
    this.colors = 'white';
    this.running = function(){
        return this.sizers + this.eat;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
why would I need 'this' in all variables ... can't I just wrap my sheep object in a function and turn it into class? –  FatDogMark Dec 4 '12 at 6:48
    
var a = new sheep(); a now has property sizes... because of 'this' –  karaxuna Dec 4 '12 at 6:50
    
'this' is current sheep class. Read here what does it mean: quirksmode.org/js/this.html –  karaxuna Dec 4 '12 at 6:54

You don't declare objects in JavaScript in the same way as you do in strongly-typed languages. You declare objects by using functions like this:

function sheep() {
    this.color = "white";
    this.size = 200;
    this.speed = 100;
    this.running = function () {
        return "the sheep is running!";
    };
}

var blacksheep = new sheep();

alert('sheep size is ' + blacksheep.size);
alert('sheep running is ' + blacksheep.running());​

Your new object does not work because you are creating a new object with a sub-object called options. options contains all of your methods. As such only the second of these three lines that you gave will give you the correct response:

alert('blackcsheep color is ' + blacksheep.colors);
alert('blackcsheep color is ' + blacksheep.options.colors); // Only this one correctly references `options`.
alert('blackcsheep running is ' + blacksheep.running());
share|improve this answer
    
I see some people make class dont need to this everything that put this.options{...} then he can create new object like blacksheep = new sheep({colors:'black',sizes=10}); , how to do that?? –  FatDogMark Dec 4 '12 at 7:11
    
My first example shows how to do just that. When you call the function new sheep(), this refers to the new object that is being created. What var blacksheep = new sheep() does is apply all the properties referenced by this in the sheep() function to the variable blacksheep. As such you can then go on to reference as I did, blacksheep.size, blacksheep.running() and so forth. Try this out here: jsfiddle.net/SZQVn –  Levi Botelho Dec 4 '12 at 7:14

in your case sheep is already an object you can not create object of an object. you can directly use that object with property.

But i think you want something like this

var sheep = {sizes:100, eat:100, colors:'white', running:function(){ return this.sizes+this.eat; } }; Object.defineProperty(sheep, 'colors', { value: 'black' , writable: true });

Thanks

share|improve this answer

Javascript is prototype based not class based. It does not use classes and is also object orientated.

var whitesheep =new sheep("100","100","white","running");
var blacksheep =new sheep("100","100","black","running");
share|improve this answer
1  
Did you try this out in browser console ? this will not work unless you define a function object and returns some kind of object which has its properties as the values passed. –  Alok Swain Dec 4 '12 at 6:53

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