Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

The code below appears in my book in the chapter about Methods. I'm a little confused about a couple of things.

  1. Is my understanding correct when I believe that the run() method is calling the createFilledCircle method?
  2. Is the run() method the receiver and the createFilledCircle the sender?
  3. for the three add(createFilledCircles...red,yellow and green); how does the programmer know what information is permitted in the argument? Is the format of (x location, y location, width of figure, height of figure) being used in the add(createFilledCircle)?


import acm.program.*;
import acm.graphics.*;
import java.awt.*;

public class StopLight extends ConsoleProgram {
  public void run() {
    double cy = getWidth() / 2 ;
    double cx=  getHeight() / 2; 

    double fx = cx - (FRAME_WIDTH / 2);
    double fy = cy - (FRAME_HEIGHT /2 );

    double dy = (FRAME_HEIGHT / 4 ) + (LAMP_RADIUS / 2);

    GRect frame = new GRect (fx, fy, FRAME_WIDTH, FRAME_HEIGHT);
    frame.setFilled(trye);
    frame.setColor(Color.GRAY);
    add(frame);

    add(createFilledCircle(cx, cy-dy, LAMP_RADIUS, Color.RED));
    add(createFilledCircle(cx, cy, LAMP_RADIUS, Color.YELLOW));
    add(createFilledCircle(cx, cy + dy, LAMP_RADIUS, Color.GREEN));
  }

  private GOval createFilledCircle (double x, double y, double r, Color color) {
    GOval circle = new GOval (x -r, y -r, 2 * r, 2 * y );
    circle.setFilled(true);
    circle.setColor(color);
    return circle; 
  }

  private static final double FRAME_WIDTH = 50; 
  private static final double FRAME_HEIGHT = 100;
  private static final LAMP_RADIUS = 10; 
}
share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

up vote 0 down vote accepted

1) Is my understanding correct when I believe that the run() method is calling the createFilledCircle method?

Yes.

2) Is the run() method the receiver and the createFilledCircle the sender?

I don't know what you mean by "receiver" and "sender". Those are not terms that people normally use when talking about methods being called.

(It looks like teminology from the Smalltalk programming language, which was an early object oriented language. In the light of that, it's exactly the other way around: you'd say run is the sender and createFilledCircle is the receiver.)

3) for the three add(createFilledCircles...red,yellow and green); how does the programmer know what information is permitted in the argument? Is the format of (x location, y location, width of figure, height of figure) being used in the add(createFilledCircle)?

The declaration of the createFilledCircle method specifies what parameters that method needs: three double values and a Color value.

In a line such as this one:

add(createFilledCircle(cx, cy-dy, LAMP_RADIUS, Color.RED));

what happens is that createFilledCircle is called first, with the arguments cx, cy-dy, LAMP_RADIUS, Color.RED, and then the return value of the method createFilledCircle, which is a GOval value, is passed to the add method. It's the same as this:

GOval result = createFilledCircle(cx, cy-dy, LAMP_RADIUS, Color.RED);
add(result);
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. Your answer was really helpful. –  Jessica M. Dec 4 '12 at 8:22

1) Is my understanding correct when I believe that the run() method is calling the createFilledCircle method?

Yes, it is correct. It is being called here inside so output of createFilledCircle is parameter to add method.

add(createFilledCircle(cx, cy-dy, LAMP_RADIUS, Color.RED));

2) Is the run() method the receiver and the createFilledCircle the sender?

I don't think it is proper terminology for this code. There is no sending and receiving. Object gets created inside createFilledCircle. run adds that object to itself.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks for your input. –  Jessica M. Dec 4 '12 at 8:22

1) Yes - it calls it at

add(createFilledCircle(cx, cy-dy, LAMP_RADIUS, Color.RED));
  add(createFilledCircle(cx, cy, LAMP_RADIUS, Color.YELLOW));
  add(createFilledCircle(cx, cy + dy, LAMP_RADIUS, Color.GREEN));

2) It is the sender, but the add() method is the receiver.

3) createFilledCircle has specified its method parameters with...

createFilledCircle (double x, double y, double r, Color color)
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your input. –  Jessica M. Dec 4 '12 at 8:23
1  
No worries - up vote some the answers you like on here - it makes us feel all warm an fuzzy :3 –  david99world Dec 4 '12 at 8:27

1) Is my understanding correct when I believe that the run() method is calling the createFilledCircle method?

Yes.

2) Is the run() method the receiver and the createFilledCircle the sender?

In object oriented programming, sender and receiver are usually the objects or classes which participate in a communication. In your case, the StopLight instance itself would be both sender and receiver when calling the createFilledCircle method from within run. As another example, in frame.setFilled(trye);, the StopLight instance (this) is the sender, and frame is the receiver of the setFilled message (in Java, a message in OOP sense is basically a method call).

3) for the three add(createFilledCircles...red,yellow and green); how does the programmer know what information is permitted in the argument? Is the format of (x location, y location, width of figure, height of figure) being used in the add(createFilledCircle)?

The programmer usually knows this through the documentation or by looking at the source code :-)

There must be at least one add method somewhere in your class hierarchy, and you need to look at the parameter list of those methods to know which arguments are permitted. Ideally there is a JavaDoc documentation available which not only lists the parameter types itself, but also gives some insight in how to use them and what the respective method actually does. In your case, since createFilledCircle returns a GOval reference, there needs to be an add method which takes a type compatible with GOval as a parameter. Likewise, the createFilledCircle method (which is declared in your class itself) takes three double values and one Color object reference, and this is actually how you also call it.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks really helpful. –  Jessica M. Dec 4 '12 at 8:26

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.