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We are using the telnet mechanism to send http request to server and get the response. We noticed a strange thing when using the telnet for sending the HTTP GET request. The first method is working in most of the environments but it's not working in one of the environment. But The second method(instead of relative path, use the complete path) is working fine in this environment.

**

  • Method1:

**

(printf "GET /test.jsp HTTP/1.0\nAccept: */*\nUser-Agent: WatchDog\n\n"; sleep 9) | telnet xx.xx.xx.xx 8093 Trying xx.xxx.xx.xx... Connected to xx.xx.xx.xx. Escape character is '^]'.

Connection closed by foreign host.

**

  • Method2:

**

(printf "GET http://xx.xx.xx.xx:8093/test.jsp HTTP/1.0\nAccept: */*\nUser-Agent: WatchDog\n\n"; sleep 9) | telnet xx.xx.xx.xx 8093

Trying xx.xx.xx.xx... 
Connected to xx.xx.xx.xx. 
Escape character is '^]'. 
HTTP/1.1 200 OK 
Server: Apache-Coyote/1.1 
Set-Cookie: JSESSIONID=91643475E80038EA8770CE6803EE320C; Path=/ 
Content-Type: text/html;charset=UTF-8 
Content-Language: zh-US 
Content-Length: 42 
Date: Mon, 03 Dec 2012 04:25:09 GMT 
Connection: close 

The Server is Running 

Connection closed by foreign host. 

Why the method1 is not running in only one environment? do we need to check some thing in that environment?

Pls give your suggestions...

Thanks, Sekhar

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2 Answers 2

HTTP/1.0 (RFC 1945) specifies the line ending to be CR LF. Some servers may apply this rule over strictly. Try with sending the request with \r\n as line endings. Sending absolute URIs is also reserved for use by proxies (section 5.1.2 of RFC 1945).

If varying line endings and URI style doesn't help you'll have to look at the servers configuration/implementation, as I can not see anything wrong with method 1.

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Apart from the line endings which must be \r\n and your accept header which should be */* instead of /, your first request doesn't have a host name.

An HTTP 1.1 server may deny HTTP requests that do not have a host set, either in the absolute request-URI or in a Host-header.

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"An HTTP 1.1 server may deny HTTP requests that do not have a host set, either in the absolute request-URI or in a Host-header" -> Can you tell me in which cases this can happen? because we are sending HTTP request to HTTP 1.1 server with out host and using relative path which is working fine in most of the environments. –  Sekhar Dec 4 '12 at 10:37
    
@Sekhar no, that's an implementation detail that should be checked with your webserver manufacturer. RFC states the server may "attempt to use heuristics (e.g., examination of the URI path for something unique to a particular host) in order to determine what exact resource is being requested.". If you just fix your request, i.e. make a valid HTTP request containing a host, either in header or URL, and \r\n to separate headers it should just work for all servers. –  CodeCaster Dec 4 '12 at 10:38

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