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a simple question:

Is there a syntax for this kind of operation in C#:

  • If condition, return the object itself : default value

Like in below example, but I don't want to evaluate the myObject twice (which could be some much more complicated thing like database query):

int myVar = (myObject == DBNull.Value ? 0 : (int)myObject);

I know there is syntax for this when checking null (like in below example), but is there for checking any different value, like DBNull.Value in this case?

int myVar = Convert.ToInt32(myObject ?? 0);
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2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

No:

int myVar = myObject == DBNull.Value ? 0 : (int)myObject;

Is the best you can do. It doesn't evalutate the object twice just because it is mentioned twice.

Or wrap it in a function of course:

int myVar = DBObjectToInt(myObject);

public static int DBObjectToInt(object dbObj)
{
  return dbObj == DBNull.Value ? 0 : (int)dbObj;
}

Another option is using Coalesce in your SQL, so you don't even get a DBNull in the first place.

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So you say this doesn't go twice the db-query here: int i =(dt.Compute("MAX( Column )", string.Empty) == DBNull.Value ? 0 : dt.Compute("MAX( Column )", string.Empty)); –  Jaska Dec 4 '12 at 9:11
    
I Know I Can store it in a temp variable, but I was hoping that i could do all this in one line of code :) –  Jaska Dec 4 '12 at 9:17
    
Yes, but I assumed myObject was the name of a variable. So you would have already done var myObject = dt.Compute("MAX( Column )", string.Empty); –  weston Dec 4 '12 at 9:17
    
You can using the function int myVar = DBObjectToInt(dt.Compute("MAX( Column )", string.Empty)); –  weston Dec 4 '12 at 9:17
1  
Another option is using Coalesce in your SQL, so you don't even get a DBNull in the first place. –  weston Dec 4 '12 at 9:25
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You don't have to evaluate the object twice. Evaluate the object, store it in a variable, and do the checks on the resulting variable.

The answer to your question is no, you can't just create your own mini language in C# at whim. There are shortcuts for the most-common operations, but a custom ternary unary operator is not one.

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I Know I Can store it in a temp variable, but I was hoping that i could do all this in one line of code :) –  Jaska Dec 4 '12 at 9:17
    
Use perl....... –  Mahmoud Al-Qudsi Dec 4 '12 at 9:19
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