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I'm trying to work through a script to email me a notification if the load is too high on our server. I found a good one but it's giving me and error when I run it, and I can't see why.

Running the code below gives the error; line 13: syntax error near unexpected token `fi'

I thought I had to laid out correctly though. Thanks!

#!/bin/bash

THR=10
MAIL="address@domain.com"

VAR=`uptime|awk -F, '{print $4}'|awk '{print $3}'`
OUT=`echo "$VAR $THR" | awk '{if ($1 > $2) print "yes"; else print "no"}'`
if [ "$VAR" == "" ]
then
# it's within the first 24 hours of uptime
VAR=`uptime|awk -F, '{print $3}'|awk '{print $3}'`
OUT=`echo "$VAR $THR" | awk '{if ($1 > $2) print "yes"; else print "no"}'`
fi
if [ "$OUT" == "yes" ]
then
echo "The current load $VAR is greater than the threshold $THR" | mail $MAIL
-s "Server Load Alert"
echo "Alert generated because $VAR is greater than $THR"
else
echo "No alert as $VAR > $THR"
fi
echo "load = $VAR"
share|improve this question
    
execute with the flag -vx in your shebang line and check exactly what the error is! #!/bin/bash -vx –  Vijay Dec 4 '12 at 9:10
    
Hmm the whitespace was giving me an error so I've removed that. Now I'm getting an unexpected end of file –  Adam Dec 4 '12 at 9:20
    
Trying running it in debug mode, #/bin/bash --debug --verbose file.sh –  Manav Dec 4 '12 at 9:27
    
Same error, is this supposed to put the contents of the error into a file? –  Adam Dec 4 '12 at 9:33

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Sorry, no offence, but your bash style is terrible!

Here's a better version:

#!/bin/bash

thr=10
mail="address@domain.com"

read var _ < /proc/loadavg

if (( $(bc -l <<< "$var>$thr") )); then
    echo "The current load $var is greater than the threshold $thr" | mail "$mail" -s "Server Load Alert"
    echo "Alert generated because $var is greater than $thr"
else
    echo "No alert as $var <= $thr"
fi
echo "load = $var"

The changes are the following:

  • Use lower case variable names, as upper case variable names are considered bad bash practice.
  • Don't parse the output of the command uptime using millions of pipes, subshells and awks because it's inefficient, the same information is obtained directly from the file /proc/loadavg, with a read builtin.
  • Don't use awk to test for inequalities, use bc, it's more efficient (and you don't need a variable $OUT at all).
  • No backticks! Use the $(...) construct instead (easier to read, to nest, and better bash practice).

I haven't tested the script, just corrected yours as I read it. Please tell me if it works for you.

share|improve this answer
    
I got the following output when running. root@server[~]# bash /scripts/load_check.sh : command not foundcheck.sh: line 2: : command not foundcheck.sh: line 5: : No such file or directory: line 6: /proc/loadavg : command not foundcheck.sh: line 7: /scripts/load_check.sh: line 15: syntax error: unexpected end of file –  Adam Dec 4 '12 at 9:49
    
@AdamG What are the scripts load_check.sh and foundcheck.sh? Could you edit your OP and include them there? –  gniourf_gniourf Dec 4 '12 at 9:59
    
load_check.sh is this script that I'm excuting. I have no idea what foundcheck.sh is. I've got plenty of other scripts running on the server, I'm not sure why this one is causing such a headache. –  Adam Dec 4 '12 at 10:05
    
@AdamG Ah it's about the script check.sh, not foundcheck.sh... Could you please check that the file /proc/loadavg exists by issuing cat /proc/loadavg. Could you also check that you have bash installed and check its version by issuing bash --version. –  gniourf_gniourf Dec 4 '12 at 10:41
    
There is definitely no script called check.sh and I'm not running a command for that. cat /proc/loadavg gives me 0.32 0.29 0.27 1/235 14795 which looks correct? Lastly it's Bash 3.2.25(1)-release. –  Adam Dec 4 '12 at 10:58
#!/bin/bash

THR=10
MAIL="address@domain.com"

VAR=`uptime|awk -F, '{print $4}'|awk '{print $3}'`
OUT=`echo "$VAR $THR" | awk '{if ($1 > $2) print "yes"; else print "no"}'`
if [ "$VAR" == "" ]
then
# it's within the first 24 hours of uptime
VAR=`uptime|awk -F, '{print $3}'|awk '{print $3}'`
OUT=`echo "$VAR $THR" | awk '{if ($1 > $2) print "yes"; else print "no"}'`
fi
if [ "$OUT" == "yes" ]
then
echo "The current load $VAR is greater than the threshold $THR" | mail $MAIL -s "Server Load Alert"
echo "Alert generated because $VAR is greater than $THR"
else
echo "No alert as $VAR > $THR"
fi
echo "load = $VAR"

This works for me. I changed so that "mail $MAIL" and -s "Server Load Alert" keeps on the same row.

share|improve this answer
    
I'm still getting an Unexpected end of file. Are there any changes I need to make on the server for it to be more forgiving? –  Adam Dec 4 '12 at 9:31
    
Execute the script but swap #!/bin/bash with #!/bin/bash -x and post the output –  Arnestig Dec 4 '12 at 9:48
    
I got the following output when running. root@server[~]# bash /scripts/load_check.sh : command not foundcheck.sh: line 2: : command not foundcheck.sh: line 5: line 22: syntax error: unexpected end of file –  Adam Dec 4 '12 at 9:54

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