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Suppose I have the class

template<class T>
class Vector
{
  public:
    Vector() = default;

    inline size_t size() const { return _vector.size(); }

  private :
    std::vector<T> _vector;
};

Is there any way to delegate functions (or operators) to _vector, at compile time, without overhead ?

I can of course (and it's what I'm doing) forward everything by declaring every functions I need, and just call the appropriate function to the member, as I did with size().

This article propose exactly what I would need. For example using this :

template<class T>
class Vector
{
  public:
    Vector() = default;

  private :
    std::vector<T> _vector;

  public:
    using _vector {
      size_t size() const;
      void push_back(const T&);
    }
};

The compiler would then generate the appropriate code. But I didn't find anything like this, is it possible ?

share|improve this question
    
I think I'm gonna suffer for mentioning it, but it's possible with private inheritance & using... –  MFH Dec 4 '12 at 9:16
1  
Your inlined function likely will forward at compile time without any overhead. The proposed shorthand for forwarding didn't make it into the standard, so you will have to do it by hand. –  Bo Persson Dec 4 '12 at 9:17
    
@BoPersson Yes, I just wanted a lazy way to do it without writing it :) –  ThePluc Dec 4 '12 at 9:20

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

First way: You can inherit std::vector<T> publicly to make such delegation possible:

template<class T>
class Vector : public std::vector<T>
...

Whether to inherit std::vector or not is little debatable, but then it's your code.

Second way: If you are particular about the composition then make Vector<T> objects behave as smart pointers:

template<typename T>
class Vector
{
  std::vector<T> _vector;    
public:
  std::vector<T>* operator -> () { return &_vector; }
};
Vector<int> vi;
vi->size(); // instead of vi.size()

Third way: Overload operator () for syntactic sugar:

template<typename T>
class Vector
{
  std::vector<T> _vector;
public:
  std::vector<T>& operator ()() { return _vector; }
  const std::vector<T>& operator ()() const { return _vector; }
};
Vector<int> vi;
vi().size(); // instead of vi.size()
share|improve this answer
    
I wanted to avoid inheritance. I like other solutions. What would be the syntax to call operator[] with the second one ? Any drawbacks for those solutions ? –  ThePluc Dec 4 '12 at 9:47
    
@ThePluc, 2nd solution is not that much effective alone. You may have to overload operator *() also to make it complete. BTW, why do you want to avoid inheritance ? –  iammilind Dec 4 '12 at 9:53
    
Because I used this simple example to explain what I wanted, but the real class would be a true composition with different members, also containers are not designed to be inherited (I saw your link :p). I'll use the operator() after checking if that's ok for me, otherwise I'll just declare by hand. I think the syntax for the second solution might be misleading, especially if working with a pointer. –  ThePluc Dec 4 '12 at 10:07
    
Just to say I accepted this as the answer since it provides an alternative with a simple syntax. The real answer is that it's not possible at the moment though :) –  ThePluc Dec 4 '12 at 10:18

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