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What's the best way to determine whether or not a string is the result / output of the serialize() function?

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7 Answers 7

up vote 95 down vote accepted

I'd say, try to unserialize it ;-)

Quoting the manual :

In case the passed string is not unserializeable, FALSE is returned and E_NOTICE is issued.

So, you have to check if the return value is false or not (with === or !==, to be sure not to have any problem with 0 or null or anything that equals to false, I'd say).

Just beware the notice : you might want/need to use the @ operator.

For instance :

$str = 'hjkl';
$data = @unserialize($str);
if ($data !== false) {
    echo "ok";
} else {
    echo "not ok";
}

Will get you :

not ok


EDIT : Oh, and like @Peter said (thanks to him!), you might run into trouble if you are trying to unserialize the representation of a boolean false :-(

So, checking that your serialized string is not equal to "b:0;" might be helpful too ; something like this should do the trick, I suppose :

$data = @unserialize($str);
if ($str === 'b:0;' || $data !== false) {
    echo "ok";
} else {
    echo "not ok";
}

testing that special case before trying to unserialize would be an optimization -- but probably not that usefull, if you don't often have a false serialized value.

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9  
But what if the unserialized value is a boolean with a value of FALSE? –  Peter Sep 2 '09 at 20:33
1  
@Peter - it's a String –  Isaac Waller Sep 2 '09 at 20:36
1  
@Peter : excellent remark ; I've edited my answer with a proposition to deal with that case ; thanks ! –  Pascal MARTIN Sep 2 '09 at 20:40
    
Thanks. :) I assumed this was probably going to be the answer.. Just seems to me that there should be a way to find out if it's serialized before actually forcing the parser to attempt to process it. –  Lorren Biffin Sep 2 '09 at 20:43
    
I added an another answer below that addresses the "false as a valid value" problem below. Let me know what you think. –  Peter Bailey Sep 2 '09 at 21:38

I didn't write this code, it's from WordPress actually. Thought I'd include it for anybody interested, it might be overkill but it works :)

<?php
function is_serialized( $data ) {
    // if it isn't a string, it isn't serialized
    if ( !is_string( $data ) )
        return false;
    $data = trim( $data );
    if ( 'N;' == $data )
        return true;
    if ( !preg_match( '/^([adObis]):/', $data, $badions ) )
        return false;
    switch ( $badions[1] ) {
        case 'a' :
        case 'O' :
        case 's' :
            if ( preg_match( "/^{$badions[1]}:[0-9]+:.*[;}]\$/s", $data ) )
                return true;
            break;
        case 'b' :
        case 'i' :
        case 'd' :
            if ( preg_match( "/^{$badions[1]}:[0-9.E-]+;\$/", $data ) )
                return true;
            break;
    }
    return false;
}
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1  
I basically needed a regex to do a basic detect, I ended up using: ^([adObis]:|N;) –  farinspace Oct 10 '11 at 23:23
1  
alternativ ans sure is this function: gist.github.com/1415653 –  bueltge Dec 1 '11 at 10:35
2  
Current WordPress version is somewhat more sophisticated: codex.wordpress.org/Function_Reference/… –  ChrisV Nov 22 '13 at 11:34
2  
+1 for giving credits. I didn't know WordPress had this built-in. Thanks for the idea -- I'll now go ahead and create an archive of useful functions from the WordPress Core. –  Amal Murali Feb 22 at 3:50

Despite Pascal MARTIN's excellent answer, I was curious if you could approach this another way, so I did this just as a mental exercise

<?php

ini_set( 'display_errors', 1 );
ini_set( 'track_errors', 1 );
error_reporting( E_ALL );

$valueToUnserialize = serialize( false );
//$valueToUnserialize = "a"; # uncomment this for another test

$unserialized = @unserialize( $valueToUnserialize );

if ( FALSE === $unserialized && isset( $php_errormsg ) && strpos( $php_errormsg, 'unserialize' ) !== FALSE )
{
  echo 'Value could not be unserialized<br>';
  echo $valueToUnserialize;
} else {
  echo 'Value was unserialized!<br>';
  var_dump( $unserialized );
}

And it actually works. The only caveat is that it will likely break if you have a registered error handler because of how $php_errormsg works.

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1  
+1 : This one is fun, I have to admit -- wouldn't have thought about it ! And I don't find a way to make it fail, too ^^ Nice work ! And thanks for the comment on my answer : without it, I would probably not have seen this answer. –  Pascal MARTIN Sep 2 '09 at 21:55
    
$a = 'bla'; $b = 'b:0;'; Try to unserialize $a then $b with this, both will fail while $b shouldn't. –  bardiir Feb 28 at 13:55
    
@bardiir It works just fine with a literal input of 'b:0;' –  Peter Bailey Feb 28 at 22:43
    
Not if there was a failure right before. Because $php_errormsg will still contain the serialization error from before and once you deserialize false then it will fail. –  bardiir Mar 6 at 17:03
    
Yeah, but only if you don't error-check in-between deserializing $a and deserializing $b, which is not practical application design. –  Peter Bailey Mar 7 at 2:52
$data = @unserialize($str);
if($data !== false || $str === 'b:0;')
    echo 'ok';
else
    echo "not ok";

Correctly handles the case of serialize(false). :)

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Optimizing Pascal MARTIN's response

/**
 * Check if a string is serialized
 * @param string $string
 */
public static function is_serial($string) {
    return (@unserialize($string) !== false);
}
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If the $string is a serialized false value, ie $string = 'b:0;' SoN9ne's function returns false, it's wrong

so the function would be

/**
 * Check if a string is serialized
 * @param string $string
 */
public static function is_serial($string) {
    return (@unserialize($string) !== false || $string == 'b:0;');
}
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/**
 * some people will look down on this little puppy
 */
function isSerialized($s){
if(
    stristr($s, '{' ) != false &&
    stristr($s, '}' ) != false &&
    stristr($s, ';' ) != false &&
    stristr($s, ':' ) != false
    ){
    return true;
}else{
    return false;
}

}
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3  
well, this would give true for many JSON strings as well, wouldnt it? So it's not reliable to determine whether the string can un/serialized. –  Gordon Sep 5 '12 at 16:56
    
Might be true, but if the alternative is serialized, or just plain text, as it was for me, it works like a charm. –  Björn3 Jul 14 '13 at 12:48
    
@Björn3 "Well it works for me in this specific case" is a really bad mentality to have when coding. There are a lot of developers who are lazy or not forward-thinking like this and it makes for a nightmare later on down the line when other developers have to work with their code or try to change something and suddenly nothing works properly anymore. –  BadHorsie Mar 18 at 11:05
    
Making completly solid code (if that even was possible) is not always the goal or the best practice. Not when it comes at an expence of time. This is only true from the programmers perspective. In real life there is a lot of circomstances where quick and dirty is the preferred way. –  Björn3 Mar 22 at 0:02

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