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I'm trying to capture a const object via copy in a (mutable) lambda. My compiler however complains, that the captured object is const.

Should it not be possible to copy the object as non-const?

struct Foo
{
    Foo(){}
    void Func(){}
};

int main()
{
    const Foo foo;
    [foo]() mutable { foo.Func(); };
}

Compiling with g++ 4.7.2:

testcase.cpp: In lambda function:
testcase.cpp:10:29: error: no matching function for call to ‘Foo::Func() const’
testcase.cpp:10:29: note: candidate is:
testcase.cpp:4:7: note: void Foo::Func() <near match>
testcase.cpp:4:7: note:   no known conversion for implicit ‘this’ parameter from ‘const Foo*’ to ‘Foo*’

Compiling with clang++ 3.1:

testcase.cpp:10:20: error: member function 'Func' not viable: 'this' argument has type 'const Foo', but function is not marked const
    std::async([foo]() mutable { foo.Func(); });

The Standard document (or rather the draft...) defines in 5.1.2.14 that "The type [...] is the type of the corresponding captured entity", so I guess that would include the cv-specifiers.
It does not seem intuitive though.

share|improve this question
    
You could explicitly copy inside your lambda body but I guess that's not what you're looking for. You could of course take r-value reference as the parameter given it's C++11. –  CashCow Dec 4 '12 at 9:55
    
What is the question? –  chill Dec 4 '12 at 10:03
    
@chill This is the question : why the copied foo object inside lambda is const? –  BЈовић Dec 4 '12 at 10:08
    
@z33ky, you quoted standard (The type [...] is the type of the corresponding captured entity), so why do you expect, that the copy will not preserve const, which should be considered as a part of the type? –  Stan Dec 4 '12 at 10:13
    
@CashCow The Foo in the actual code I want this is is not movable. –  z33ky Dec 4 '12 at 10:49

2 Answers 2

First, the type of a lambda expression, which has capture, is a class type (5.1.2 Lambda expressions [expr.prim.lambda] #3)

That type has an operator() which is by default const, unless mutable is used in the lambda expression ([expr.prim.lambda] #5)

Next, for each entity captured as copy, a unnamed member is declared in the closure type. [expr.prim.lambda] #14]

If you explicitly build the (mostly) equivalent of the capture type, everything will naturally follow from the usual semantics for classes, const-qualified types and const qualified member functions.

Example:

struct S
{
  void f();
  void fc() const;
};

void g()
{
  S s0;

  // [s0] ()  { s0.f(); }; // error, operator() is const
  [s0] () { s0.fc(); };    // OK, operator() is const, S::fc is const

  [s0] () mutable { s0.f(); };
  [s0] () mutable { s0.fc(); };

  const S s1;

  // [s1] ()  { s1.f(); }; // error, s1 is const, no matter if operator() is const
  [s1] ()  { s1.fc(); };

  // [s1] () mutable { s1.f(); }; // error, s1 is const, no matter if operator() is const
  [s1] () mutable { s1.fc(); };
}

I guess the confusion stems from the fact that mutable in the lambda-declarator concerns the const-ness of the operator(), not the mutable-ility of the data members of the closure type. It would be more natural to use const, as with member functions, but I guess the standards committee wanted const to be the default.

share|improve this answer
    
Well, I figured out what the mutable keyword does for the lambda. If the members of the closure would be non-const, then I would need the mutable-specifier on the lambda to access the non-const function. I was just wondering if there was a way to copy the const variables as non-const into the closure. –  z33ky Dec 4 '12 at 10:46
    
@z33ky, capture it implicitly, copy it explicitly :) [&]() mutable { Foo f(foo); f.Func(); }; –  chill Dec 4 '12 at 10:57
    
I'm returning the lambda from a function, so that captured reference would be invalidated. I guess I'll have to construct a Funktor myself or rely on const_cast. Or live with one unnecessary copy-ctor call. –  z33ky Dec 4 '12 at 11:17
    
@chill auto f = foo; [f] { f.Func(); }; is closer to the intended semantics. –  Luc Danton Dec 4 '12 at 22:39

Another possible workaround:

  struct Foo
  {
      Foo(){}
      void Func(){}
  };

  int main()
  {
      const Foo foo;
      {
          Foo& fooo= const_cast<Foo&>(foo);
          [fooo]() mutable { fooo.Func(); };
      }
  }

This solution has safety problems (accidental modification of const object through non-const reference is possible), but additional copying is avoided.

share|improve this answer
    
If this is necessary, it means Func() should have been marked const. If so, this is a separate issue from the lambda, so this answer, while true, isn't really a solution. (One would either fix Func() to be cv-qualified, or if modification is not possible provide a free-function void Func_unsafe(const Foo& f) { const_cast<Foo&>(f).Func(); } and use that in the lambda; regardless, the lambda has no business with the issue.) –  GManNickG Dec 4 '12 at 19:43
    
GManNickG: If Func really modifies the object and is marked const, it is global security issue for the whole program, whenever the const Foo appears. By introducing const-casted reference (instead of making Func const), I localized this issue inside the block around the lambda, where the const-casted refernce resides. As const-casted fooo is used only for making a copy,the only restriction is that Foo's copy ctor shouldn't modify the object (what is the usual case). Not perfect, I agree, but it is better than making Func() const globally. –  user396672 Dec 5 '12 at 8:04
    
GManNickG: ... As to void Func_unsafe(), it exposes UB since it modifies an object that is actually const (i.e. const member of the lambda class) –  user396672 Dec 5 '12 at 8:04
    
The whole premise of my comment was that Func() should have been marked const and, of course, could be. That's the only reason for your cast. –  GManNickG Dec 5 '12 at 15:47
    
GManNickG: no, the reason for "my cast" is to capture (by value!) const Foo by making its non-const copy inside the lambda class. After that arbitrary non-const function may safely modify this non-const copy, since the original const object remains unchanged (it is exactly what the OP wants to achive). The only possible vulnerability i can see is that copy constructor (since we remove const qualifier from its argument) can attempt to change original object, but it is unlikely. –  user396672 Dec 6 '12 at 9:53

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