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I have refactored some views through user defined functions and I want to ensure they are the same.

I have written a small script to test this is the case:

SET ANSI_NULLS OFF
GO

SELECT TOP 1000 [DealNumber]
      ,...others
FROM OLD_VIEW
EXCEPT
SELECT TOP 1000 [DealNumber]
            ,...others
  FROM NEW_VIEW

When I apply this, I obtain a number of rows as the result. However, if I take a DealNumber from any of the rows and I run the following:

SET ANSI_NULLS OFF
GO

SELECT [DealNumber]
      ,...others
FROM OLD_VIEW
WHERE DealNumber = 'MyDealNumber'
EXCEPT
SELECT [DealNumber]
            ,...others
FROM NEW_VIEW
WHERE DealNumber = 'MyDealNumber'

this returns, as expected, an empty record set.

As an alternative approach, I have written a function Test_View_Correctness which does the former test. However if I run it like this:

SELECT TOP 1000 [DealNumber] from OLD_VIEW
where DealNumber IN (SELECT a.DealNumber 
                     FROM Test_View_Correctness(DealNumber) as a)

How can I ensure the except approach works?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You need to order by a unique set of columns—without that SQL never guarantees row order and the two parts of the query will potentially return completely different subsets of rows:

SELECT ... FROM ( SELECT TOP 1000 [DealNumber],...others 
                  FROM OLD_VIEW 
                  ORDER BY x,y,z ) a
EXCEPT
SELECT ... FROM ( SELECT TOP 1000 [DealNumber],...others
                  FROM NEW_VIEW
                  ORDER BY x,y,z ) b
share|improve this answer
    
this yields Incorrect syntax near the keyword 'ORDER'. –  Edmondo1984 Dec 4 '12 at 9:39
    
From SQL BOL: Column names or aliases in ORDER BY clauses must reference column names returned by the left-side query. –  Steve Ford Dec 4 '12 at 10:00
    
@Edmondo1984 see edit –  Jack Douglas Dec 4 '12 at 10:25

This is caused be the fact that you are using Top 1000 to restrict the rows that the Except is working on. EXCEPT returns any distinct values from the left query that are not also found on the right query. You would be better using NOT EXISTS e.g.

SELECT TOP 1000 [DealNumber]
           ,... others
FROM OLD_VIEW
WHERE NOT EXISTS
   (SELECT * FROM NEW_VIEW WHERE OLD_VIEW.[DealNumber] = [DealNumber])

--- Update based upon further clarification

;WITH NV
AS
(
    SELECT *, CHECKSUM(*) as CHK
    FROM NEW_VIEW
),
OV
AS
(
    SELECT *, CHECKSUM(*) AS CHK
)
SELECT *
FROM NV
FULL OUTER JOIN OV
    ON NV.DealNumber = OV.DealNumber
WHERE NV.DealNumber IS NULL -- CATCH missing rows in new view
   OR OV.DealNumber IS NULL -- CATCH extra rows in new view
   OR NV.CHK <> OV.CHK      -- CATCH differing columns in either view
share|improve this answer
    
How can I do this simply with about 20 columns to match? –  Edmondo1984 Dec 4 '12 at 9:38
    
#Edmondo1984 - Sorry I misinterpreted your question. Do your views have any text, ntext, image or xml columns? If not you should be able to rewrite the query using a full outer join and the checksum(*) function to test for equality. –  Steve Ford Dec 4 '12 at 9:46
    
no...the biggest column is a varchar(255) the others are mainly numeric. Could you please provide more details? Thank you –  Edmondo1984 Dec 4 '12 at 9:51

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