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I've tried two ways to declare a member function in JS:

function init() {
    var name = "Mozilla";
    function displayName() {
        alert(name);
    }
}
a = new init();
a.displayName()

And

function init() {
    var name = "Mozilla";
    displayName = function() {
        alert(name);
    }
}
a = new init();
a.displayName()

The first method told me that displayName() is undefined. The way I see it a variable of type Function with nae displayName is created, and thus it should work. Any one care to explain why it didn't work?

Thanks

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5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted

To create something like a member function you need to add it to the protoype of the constructor function:

function init() {
    this.name = 'Mozilla';
}
init.prototype.displayName = function() {
    alert(this.name);
}

I also highly recommend you to read something about how the object system in JavaScript works. There's a pretty good article about it on MDN: https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/JavaScript/Introduction_to_Object-Oriented_JavaScript

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It doesn't work because that's now how JavaScript works. Just declaring a function within a constructor function doesn't set it up on the object created by the constructor function, you have to make the link between the object and the function explicitly (directly by assigning it to the object, or more often indirectly via a prototype).

The typical way you do that is via prototypical inheritance, although you can also just assign functions directly to individual objects (more below — but you talked about "member functions," and the typical way you do things like that in JavaScript is via prototypes).

There are a couple of ways to set up prototypical inheritance. The classic way, which is compatible with a broad range of JavaScript engines even in legacy browsers, is via the prototype property on constructor functions, which refers to an object. That object becomes the prototype of instances created via new FunctionName. You add properties to that object to share them amongst the instances created by that function.

So, using prototypical inheritance:

function Init(name) {
    this.name = name;
}
Init.prototype.displayName = function() {
    alert(this.name);
};

var i = new Init("Mozilla");
i.displayName();

Notes on the above:

  1. In JavaScript, the overwhelming convention is that constructor functions start with an upper case letter. So I called it Init rather than init.

  2. All functions automatically have a prototype property on them, which is a blank object.

  3. I add a property to that object called displayName which refers to a function.

  4. Rather than hard-coding the name, I pass it into Init as an argument.

  5. Note that I store the name on a property on the newly-constructed instance; within the call to Init, that instance is available as this.

  6. Similarly, because displayName is called as part of an expression retrieving the function reference from the object, this is the object within the call to displayName, and so this.name has the name.

  7. To keep things simple in the above, I assigned an anonymous function to displayName. (The property has a name, the function does not.) I tend not to do that in real code.

  8. All instances constructed via new Init will share the same copy of the displayName function, via the prototype.

More to explore (on my blog):

You might also be interested in my Lineage toolkit, if you're interested in building classes of objects in JavaScript (and hierarchies).

As of ES5, there's another option: Object.create. This allows you to create objects and assign them prototypes directly, without using constructor functions. But as you used new, which means you're using constructor functions, I won't go into detail on that.

Now, you don't have to use the prototype features of JavaScript if you don't want to. You can, for instance, do this:

function Init(name) {
    var name = name;

    this.displayName = function() {
        alert(name);
    };
}
var i = new Init("Mozilla");
i.displayName();

That doesn't use the prototype features of JavaScript, instead it just creates a new displayName function every time you call Init and assigns it directly to the object. (Any reasonable quality JavaScript engine will be smart enough to reuse the code of the function, but there will be distinct function objects for each instance). The above also makes the name property completely private, because the function we create on each call is a closure over the local variable name. (More: Closures are not complicated)

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It is entirely reasonable to assign property values without using prototypes. –  Rob Dec 4 '12 at 10:11
    
@Rob: Yes, it is. But the OP talks about "member functions", and the above is the typical way you do that. I have to say to the downvoter (whether you or someone else) that I think it quite harsh to call the above answer "not useful" (as the downvote button puts it). –  T.J. Crowder Dec 4 '12 at 10:13
    
Your post was misleading. "It doesn't work because that's now how JavaScript works." In fact, you can do something almost what the OP was trying to do, and it's how you create private variables. There are cases to be made for using prototypal inheritance, but there are also cases to be made for having private variables. –  Rob Dec 4 '12 at 10:18
    
@Rob: The OP was expecting that just declaring a function within a constructor function would somehow make it a member function. That isn't how JavaScript works, so I said so. Not misleading at all. I've added a non-prototype section to the answer in case they want to not using prototypes, although I note in the meantime that an answer has been accepted -- using prototypes. –  T.J. Crowder Dec 4 '12 at 10:21
    
Thanks. I've un-down-voted you because you added that in. I will say that one of the most unclear things about JavaScript for someone coming from C# or Java is that "this" isn't implicitly present. That's why I said the OP was trying to create a member. This is a mistake that I regularly run into, and I've been writing JS for years. It's easy to overlook. –  Rob Dec 4 '12 at 10:30

The following should work:

function Init() {
    var name = "Mozilla";
    this.displayName = function() {
        alert(name);
    }
}
a = new Init();
a.displayName()
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2  
It creates the method again and again for each instance though. –  ThiefMaster Dec 4 '12 at 10:04
1  
Yes it does. Each object orientation pattern in JS has its own advantages and disadvantages. The above method is bit more readable, and could be used if one/few instances of the object is created. The MDN article that @ThiefMaster has given is a good starting point –  janith Dec 4 '12 at 10:18

One of the standards you can use is

var init = (function() {

    var name = "Mozilla"; // Shared by all instances

    function init() {
        this.name = "IE"; // Spesific to the created instance                  
    }    

    init.prototype = {
        displayName: function() {
            alert(name);
            alert(this.name);
        }        
    }

    return init;

})();

var a = new init();
a.displayName();​
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In your first method:

function init() { var name = "Mozilla"; function displayName() { alert(name); } } a = new init(); a.displayName()

function displayName(){} only can be called in init(), it's like private function, so can not be used as a public function of the object(init())

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