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Error: cant convert undefined to object : this.page[1]=100;. It is already defined, whats wrong? enter image description here

var sheepclass ;
(function($) {
    sheepclass = function(handler){
        var $div = $('div');            
        this.handler = $.extend({
            'sizes': 'thin', 
            'eat': 'grass',
            'color': 'white',
            'page':[],
            myalert: function() {
                myconsole();
                function myconsole() {
                    this.page[0] = 100; 
                    console.log(this.page[0]);
                }
            },
            myalert2: function() {
                this.myalert();
            }
        },handler);
    }
})(jQuery);

$(document).ready(function(){
    var blacksheep = new sheepclass({'color':'black'});
    blacksheep.handler.myalert2();
})
share|improve this question
    
Why do you need to wrap that in a document ready handler? Your code involves zero DOM manipulation. So many code smells here. –  Asad Dec 4 '12 at 10:10
    
classic issue of understanding the scope of this –  Travis J Dec 4 '12 at 10:10
    
That myalert section looks dodgy. Why are you adding a function there that executes a function, then initializes that function? –  Cerbrus Dec 4 '12 at 10:11
    
I am making a jquery plugin that's allow people to new an object outside, whats the problem? –  FatDogMark Dec 4 '12 at 10:11

5 Answers 5

up vote 0 down vote accepted

make a that variable for this

    var sheepclass ;
    (function($) {
        sheepclass = function(handler){
            var $div = $('div');            
            this.handler = $.extend({
                'sizes': 'thin', 
                'eat': 'grass',
                'color': 'white',
                'page':[200,300],
                myalert: function() {
                    var that = this;
                    myconsole();
                    function myconsole() {
                        that.page = that.page || []
                        that.page[0] = 100; 
                        console.log(that.page[0]);
                    }
                },
                myalert2: function() {
                    this.myalert();
                }
            },handler);
        }
    })(jQuery);

    $(document).ready(function(){
        var blacksheep = new sheepclass({'color':'black'});
        blacksheep.handler.myalert2();
    })
share|improve this answer
    
yeah this is good –  FatDogMark Dec 4 '12 at 10:22

Try this, passing the context by using that helper variable

var sheepclass ;
(function($) {
    sheepclass = function(handler){
        var $div = $('div');
        var that = this;
        this.handler = $.extend({
            'sizes': 'thin', 
            'eat': 'grass',
            'color': 'white',
            'page':[],
            myalert: function() {
                myconsole();
                function myconsole() {
                    that.handler.page[0] = 100; 
                    console.log(that.handler.page[0]);
                }
            },
            myalert2: function() {
                this.myalert();
            }
        },handler);
    }
})(jQuery);

$(document).ready(function(){
    var blacksheep = new sheepclass({'color':'black'});
    blacksheep.handler.myalert2();
})
share|improve this answer
    
You don't need to have the closure variable all the way out there. You can use the this from inside myalert. –  Asad Dec 4 '12 at 10:23

Inside myconsole this is not equal to your object, but refers to Window instead. Therefore this.page is undefined -- the value you index into page with does not make a difference.

You have to change the call to:

myconsole.call(this);
share|improve this answer
    
yes,it works, but strange, then I have change all my functions become *.call(this)... I have many functions.. why have to use these weird methods. its getting strange –  FatDogMark Dec 4 '12 at 10:14
1  
@FatDogMark: It's not clear why you have many nested functions. You could of course capture this into another variable (e.g. that) and write that.page instead of this.page, but it would still mean you have to find all references to this and change them to that. There is no easier way to do what you are doing, which means that what you are doing is not a good idea. –  Jon Dec 4 '12 at 10:16

A lot of this code seems to be pointless. The document.ready handler is unnecessary, since there is no DOM manipulation, as is the IIFE. Your code could be reduced to:

var sheepclass = function(handler){
    this.handler = $.extend({
        'sizes': 'thin', 
        'eat': 'grass',
        'color': 'white',
        'page':[],
        myalert: function() {
            var context = this;
            function myconsole() {
                context.page[0] = 100; 
                console.log(context.page[0]);
            }
            myconsole();
        }
    },handler);
}

var blacksheep = new sheepclass({'color':'black'});
blacksheep.handler.myalert();

Notice also that having a method that does nothing but invoke another method is unnecessary.

share|improve this answer

Becouse "this" is referred to myconsole function.

Try this:

var sheepclass ;
(function($) {
    sheepclass = function(handler){
        var $div = $('div');    
        **var page = this.page;**
        this.handler = $.extend({
            'sizes': 'thin', 
            'eat': 'grass',
            'color': 'white',
            'page':[],
            myalert: function() {
                myconsole();
                function myconsole() {
                    **page**[0] = 100; 
                    console.log(**page**[0]);
                }
            },
            myalert2: function() {
                this.myalert();
            }
        },handler);
    }
})(jQuery);
share|improve this answer
    
what's up with the asterisks ? –  Willem D'haeseleer Dec 4 '12 at 10:19
    
doesn't seems to work.. –  FatDogMark Dec 4 '12 at 10:20
    
asterisks is bold style, sorry. –  ilCrosta Dec 4 '12 at 10:26

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