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What is the correct way to format the code? and why is it so necessary? Why should all programmer follow the same rule of formatting and basically, what is the rule??

Why programmer prefers to write as

<html>
    <head>
        <title>Title</title>
    </head>

    <body>
        <!--body-->
    </body>
</html>

instead of

<html>
<head>
<title>Title</title>
</head>
<body>
<!--body-->
</body>
</html>

Could someone please make it more clear? and, is there any special thing about javascript and css formatting? What are the advantages and disadvantages of formatting?

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closed as not constructive by Fabian Barney, Rohit Azad, Salman A, Jukka K. Korpela, ChrisF Dec 4 '12 at 13:15

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6  
It makes code more clear. –  BoltClock Dec 4 '12 at 10:11
    
this doesn't answer my all questions.. –  Prakash Dec 4 '12 at 10:11
1  
It shows the your code clear and if somebody else will work on your project so the person can easily understand your code :-) if made a markup in a proper manner....... –  Shailender Arora Dec 4 '12 at 10:12
    
@BoltClock he is right, you can't see the difference in the above 8 line example,but a huge code with proper formatting and code structure makes it easy while debugging the code. –  danish hashmi Dec 4 '12 at 10:14
    
as @BoltClock said it makes it clearer. Advantage: code easy to understand, easy to modify, Disadvantage: it makes the page a little more heavier. –  Mihai Iorga Dec 4 '12 at 10:15

12 Answers 12

There are no correct way in formatting.

Newlines and indentations are usually done only for human readability (except some language like Python) and no one true standard that everyone agrees upon.

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It's about being able to look back at your code and easily being able to see what sections are blocks of code that are contained within other tags. Frequently you'll have lots of divs in a page, with many divs contained within other divs. Simple indenting can help work out which matches the opening div you're currently looking at.

<div id='start'>
<div id='insideStart'>
<div id='insideInsideStart'>
</div>
</div>
</div>

would not look as clear as

<div id='start'>
   <div id='insideStart'>
      <div id='insideInsideStart'>
      </div>
   </div>
</div>
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This is a question well suited to be read in such books as

  • Clean Code
  • Pragmatic Programmer

But to answer your questions.

First off: "Why programmer prefers to write as..." This is solely to make the code more clear and further it more adheres to structure. Structure to make what you're making clearer to me as a human and fellow coder.

Adhering to a set standard of naming conventions and structure helps new developers get in to your code faster and it will be less prone to bugs such as typos and common mistakes.

The other question you're asking is: "What are the advantages and disadvantages of formatting"

Advantages - all of the above

Disadvantage - It might be a performance hit but I think not.

And the last question you ask is "Why should all programmer follow the same rule of formatting and basically, what is the rule??"

There is no clear rule on how you should code as long as you follow your teams convention. This makes it easier for developers after you that has the dirty job of cleaning up your mess or trying to figure out your way of thinking when you did that one function which is now starting to get old or is bugging out.

There are however some "common ways", if you will, when naming variables and functions and so on and these are explained in detail here. These are for javascript, which you are asking for, but most of it can be used in other languages as well.

I hope this answers your questions.

But as @BoltClock said, and this is what you should aim for, make your code clear. This is number one priority of all programmers, or well, it should be.

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The big thing for me (with HTML in this example, but it carries over to programming as well) is to tell scope.

Your HTML example is pretty simplistic, but often times there are far more nested structures which can get quite confusing. For example:

<html>
<head></head>
<body>
<div id="container">
<div class="shadow">
<div class="inner">
<h1>Hello World</h1>
</div>
<div id="handle">
<span id="foo">Bar</span>
</div>
</div>
<div id="morefoo">
<h3>Hi</h3>
</div>
</div>
</body>
</html>

If I told you to add another div to the div with class shadow, you may need to do some <div> </div> counting. But with the markup formatted below, it is pretty easy.

<html>
    <head></head>
    <body>
        <div id="container">
            <div class="shadow">
                <div class="inner">
                    <h1>Hello World</h1>
                </div>
                <div id="handle">
                    <span id="foo">Bar</span>
                </div>
            </div>
            <div id="morefoo">
                <h3>Hi</h3>
            </div>
        </div>
    </body>
</html>
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As of writing down HTML markup or CSS - this is not about programming. Anyway the standard of writing a clear and clean HTML markup is to indent any child element by one tab thus the code looks like in Your first example. This way the code get nicely structured and readable.

As of writing down the CSS code there is no standart AFAIK, but I saw three styles of formatting the CSS code:

1.

body { ... }
div#container { ... }
div#container #left-column { ... }

2.

body {
    ...
}
div#container {
    ...
}
div#container #left-column {
    ...
}

3.

body {
    ...
}
div#container {
    ...
}
    div#container #left-column {
        ...
    }

The difference between the second and the third example is in that in the third example by indenting div#container #left-column by one more tab You are showing off that this rule is for the element that is inside the parent div#container. The first example keeps the CSS code more compact but is less readable and is not very good option when having many rules on that one line (the line could get very long).

As of writting down the JS code here the rules for formatting should same (or at least very similar) as when writting down the PHP code...

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In most cases, formatting is there for the benefit of the programmer, not for the computer.

As far as the computer is concerned, the indentation is completely irrelevant. This can be seen in action with "code minimizers", which take a program and remove all the white space to compress it and make it into a smaller download. Likewise there are "code tidier" tools, which do the opposite -- take a badly formatted program and set the indentation so that it is more readable.

So the real reason for indenting code is to make it readable. It's for your benefit.

You may think your code is perfectly readable without indentation, but I can assure you it isn't. If you think it is, try coming back to some of your old code after six months of not reading it. But it's not just for your own sake; if you need to share the code with others -- say on a site like this one -- other people will find your code much easier to read, and therefore much easier to help you, if they can read your code easily.

 * Note: The exception to all this are a handful of languages like Python in which the indentation is a significant part of the code, and tells the program which lines are part of which structure. In these languages, indentation is a part of the language, so it's there for the program as well as for the programmer.

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You should understand that for compiler there is totally no difference in performance for code like this:

<html>
    <head>
        <title>Title</title>
    </head>

    <body>
        <!--body-->
    </body>
</html>

and this

<html>
<head>
<title>Title</title>
</head>
<body>
<!--body-->
</body>
</html>

and even this

<html>    <head><title>Title</    title></head>
<body><!--body--></body>                                  </html>

All of them would compile and work the same way with totally same performance. However, main purpose for code formatting is readability. Dividing code in blocks like this makes it easier for programmer to understand, thus letting him see programm's logic more clearly. It's easier to maintain and understand for you and people working with code after you.
All of this is resulting in more effecient development (since you waste less time on understanding code, since everything is organized, resulting in less development mistakes, less bugs, thus letting you spend more time on development, making development easier and faster).

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The general rule of thumb is to indent code with 4 spaces or a tab. Many Open Source projects adhere to the 4 spaces rule in their coding standards, to name a few:

In your HTML example, it is less beneficial because the closing tags explicitly state their element type, it's still useful though for finding the opening/closing tags of nested divs and other elements.

In other languages that use the braces syntax (and one's that don't for example PLSQL), it is extremely helpful to indent code. Example:

for(...)
{
if(..)
{
while(..)
{

}
}
else
{

}
}

The above is hard to read compared to:

for(...)
{
    if(..)
    {
        while(..)
        {

        }
    }
    else
    {

    }
}

With the indentation above, the flow of execution and the start/end braces of each block can easily and quickly be read.

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4 spaces is not that much a rule of thumb. There are also codes which indent 2 or 3 or even 8 spaces –  billyswong Dec 4 '12 at 10:20
1  
@billyswong I disagree with that, 4 spaces is what almost all open source projects ask for in the coding standards. –  MrCode Dec 4 '12 at 10:33

As far as I know, these three rules govern the idea of code indentation.

  • Make it clear for your to read
  • To know the beginning and ending of a block of code
  • To leave it nicer, for someone who will work on your code latter

How to indent codes? - I would base that, from a start to end of brackets or functions, or based on tasking as loops, arrays...

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One big issue in coding is code maintenance. One developer always thinks that his code will work forever, is bullet proof and will never require any alteration. That is obviously not true. Hence, another dev will certainly have to dig in this code, which is usually difficult if the original coder has not formatted and documented his code. Formatting is about readability and re-usability.

You can follow usually accepted guidelines, such as summarized there for javascript : http://google-styleguide.googlecode.com/svn/trunk/javascriptguide.xml?showone=Code_formatting#Code_formatting

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Every language has different coding standards, more or less popular.

Why use a coding standard : easier for you/your team/others to read, give the sense of "unity" in a project. Think that without coding standards in bigger projects you'll see code like this :

if (condition) return FALSE;
else {
$x=1;
} else $x=3;if (condition2) return true;

Examples for PHP coding standards :

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A great way to make sure your site works properly is to write your HTML. This will allow you to focus on the content and the functions and test them before you start making everything pretty.

For more info read these two articles :-

1. The Significance of Proper Markup in Web Design

2. What Beautiful HTML Code Looks Like

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who down-voted please explain me ...... –  Shailender Arora Dec 4 '12 at 10:24
    
It is offtopic. –  billyswong Dec 4 '12 at 10:24
1  
open the links and read the artices than you will know it its offtopic or ontopic @billyswong –  Shailender Arora Dec 4 '12 at 10:25
    
did you check the articles @billyswong –  Shailender Arora Dec 4 '12 at 10:27
    
The links may be relevant but the paragraph you wrote are not. The question is not about writing HTML properly but more on code formatting (not webpage formatting) –  billyswong Dec 4 '12 at 10:28

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