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Is there any way to redefine a class or some of its methods without using typical inheritance? For example:

class third_party_library {
    function buggy_function() {
        return 'bad result';
    }
    function other_functions(){
        return 'blah';
    }
}

What can I do to replace buggy_function()? Obviously this is what I would like to do

class third_party_library redefines third_party_library{
    function buggy_function() {
        return 'good result';
    }
    function other_functions(){
        return 'blah';
    }
}

This is my exact dilemma: I updated a third party library that breaks my code. I don't want to modify the library directly, as future updates could break the code again. I'm looking for a seamless way to replace the class method.

I've found this library that says it can do it, but I'm wary as it's 4 years old.

EDIT:

I should have clarified that I cannot rename the class from third_party_library to magical_third_party_library or anything else because of framework limitations.

For my purposes, would it be possible to just add a function to the class? I think you can do this in C# with something called a "partial class."

share|improve this question
    
PHP does not support that. You can extend the class and re-use it. That is it. Sorry. –  Till Sep 26 '08 at 0:48
    
Can you rename the original buggy class? Rename it to buggy_third_party, and exend it yourself, giving your class the original name. –  gnud Dec 7 '08 at 13:16

10 Answers 10

up vote 22 down vote accepted

It's called monkey patching. But, PHP doesn't have native support for it.

Though, as others have also pointed out, the runkit library is available for adding support to the language and is the successor to classkit. And, though it seemed to have been abandoned by its creator (having stated that it wasn't compatible with PHP 5.2 and later), the project does now appear to have a new home and maintainer.

I still can't say I'm a fan of its approach. Making modifications by evaluating strings of code has always seemed to me to be potentially hazardous and difficult to debug.

Still, runkit_method_redefine appears to be what you're looking for, and an example of its use can be found in /tests/runkit_method_redefine.phpt in the repository:

runkit_method_redefine('third_party_library', 'buggy_function', '',
    'return \'good result\''
);
share|improve this answer
    
this was accepted as the answer: does that mean that PHP supports it? some more information would be nice. –  nickf Dec 7 '08 at 13:04
    
@nickf: "I don't believe" is a negation; so the OP means "not supported in PHP". As far as I can tell, PHP does not support monkey patching. –  Piskvor Feb 17 '10 at 9:16
    
@Piskvor, well yes - I can read, but it was curious that this answer was accepted over the other ones which offered some form of guidance. –  nickf Feb 17 '10 at 13:06

runkit seems like a good solution but its not enabled by default and parts of it are still experimental. So I hacked together a small class which replaces function definitions in a class file. Example usage:

class Patch {

private $_code;

public function __construct($include_file = null) {
    if ( $include_file ) {
        $this->includeCode($include_file);
    }
}

public function setCode($code) {
    $this->_code = $code;
}

public function includeCode($path) {

    $fp = fopen($path,'r');
    $contents = fread($fp, filesize($path));
    $contents = str_replace('<?php','',$contents);
    $contents = str_replace('?>','',$contents);
    fclose($fp);        

    $this->setCode($contents);
}

function redefineFunction($new_function) {

    preg_match('/function (.+)\(/', $new_function, $aryMatches);
    $func_name = trim($aryMatches[1]);

    if ( preg_match('/((private|protected|public) function '.$func_name.'[\w\W\n]+?)(private|protected|public)/s', $this->_code, $aryMatches) ) {

        $search_code = $aryMatches[1];

        $new_code = str_replace($search_code, $new_function."\n\n", $this->_code);

        $this->setCode($new_code);

        return true;

    } else {

        return false;

    }

}

function getCode() {
    return $this->_code;
}
}

Then include the class to be modified and redefine its methods:

$objPatch = new Patch('path_to_class_file.php');
$objPatch->redefineFunction("
    protected function foo(\$arg1, \$arg2)
    {   
        return \$arg1+\$arg2;
    }");

Then eval the new code:

eval($objPatch->getCode());

A little crude but it works!

share|improve this answer
    
that's a trip! the eval statement then defines the class with the replaced function? so all I need to do is instantiate the object and run with it? –  SeanDowney Jun 10 '11 at 21:55
1  
Yessir! That's all you need to do. –  JPhilly Aug 11 '11 at 21:06

For the sake of completeness - monkey patching is available in PHP through runkit. For details, see runkit_method_redefine().

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1  
thanks for adding a complete answer to this question! –  nickf Dec 7 '08 at 13:06

Yes, it's called extend:

<?php
class sd_third_party_library extends third_party_library
{
    function buggy_function() {
        return 'good result';
    }
    function other_functions(){
        return 'blah';
    }
}

I prefixed with "sd". ;-)

Keep in mind that when you extend a class to override methods, the method's signature has to match the original. So for example if the original said buggy_function($foo, $bar), it has to match the parameters in the class extending it.

PHP is pretty verbose about it.

share|improve this answer
    
That would normally work however I cannot change the class name due to how framework i'm using is setup –  SeanDowney Sep 26 '08 at 0:10
3  
Then the answer is, you cannot. –  Till Sep 26 '08 at 0:13
    
Why am I getting downvoted? =) –  Till Sep 26 '08 at 0:21

How about wrapping it in another class like

class Wrapper {
 private $third_party_library;
 function __construct() { $this->third_party_library = new Third_party_library(); }
 function __call($method, $args) {
  return call_user_func_array(array($this->third_party_library, $method), $args);
 }
}
share|improve this answer
    
This is perfect for wrapping a major class. you can also pass the original php variable to the constructor and swap it out with $this. (handy for a major class, not so handy for lots of instances) –  GDmac Dec 31 '13 at 12:17

There's alway extending the class with a new, proper, method and calling that class instead of the buggy one.

class my_better_class Extends some_buggy_class {
    function non_buggy_function() {
        return 'good result';
    }
}

(Sorry for the crappy formatting)

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Zend Studio and PDT (eclipse based ide) have some built in refractoring tools. But there are no built in methods to do this.

Also you wouldn't want to have bad code in your system at all. Since it could be called upon by mistake.

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ok... hmm... don't tell my boss, but I will share the Aspect.class.php with you. It's something that (uppon calling hijackAspect($path);) "includes" your class with a nice proxy override on it.

http://agenciavalemais.com.br/roger/Aspect.class.php.zip

you can adapt the Aspect class to override the buggy method you need by simply writting the method outside of the magic _call there.

but just a warning, you will have to remove all the require_once's or use a "import" function to check for the class existance rather than if the file is in the included list.

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If the library is explicitly creating the bad class and not using a locater or dependency system you are out of luck. There is no way to override a method on another class unless you subclass. The solution might be to create a patch file that fixes the library, so you can upgrade the library and re-apply the patch to fix that specific method.

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You might be able to do this with runkit. http://php.net/runkit

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