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Edit: Before down-voting, please note that I really, actually have made sure that there are only 4-space-wide spaces used for indentation and I've made this perfectly clear in the question. No, really, in actual reality, I really, actually have made 100% certain beyond even unreasonable doubt. There is a particular part of reality which we all share, in which there is light and sound and we all interact with energy and matter; IN THAT REALITY, I have made 100% certain that this is NOT, I repeat, that it is NOT a case of inconsistent tabs and spaces. I found the solution and it had nothing to do with inconsistent spaces or tabs. Now feel free to down vote but please tell me why, in a comment, so that I know what to improve. Thank you.

Original question:

I'm getting a strange indentation error in Python.

The error is: IndentationError: unexpected indent

for uuid in uuids:
    sys.stdout.write('Checking \'' + uuid + '\'...')
    result = qp.get('v2/customer/' + uuid + '/')
    sys.stdout.write(' exists with status=' + result.status + '.')

    if result.status != 'S':
        sys.stdout.write(' Fixing... ')
        qp.put('v2/customer/' + uuid + '/', { 'status': 'S' })
        sys.stdout.write('done.')

    sys.stdout.write('\n') # <- This is where the error occurs

There are only spaces used, no tabs. The indentation really seems fine. I've found nothing useful about this online; every single answer mentions tab/space inconsistency or finds something wrong with the indentation itself, but in this case, I really can't see what the issue could be.

I'm using Vim as an editor, in case it matters.

Thanks in advance.

share|improve this question

closed as too localized by moooeeeep, Andy Hayden, Wooble, ekhumoro, Jim Garrison Dec 6 '12 at 9:48

This question is unlikely to help any future visitors; it is only relevant to a small geographic area, a specific moment in time, or an extraordinarily narrow situation that is not generally applicable to the worldwide audience of the internet. For help making this question more broadly applicable, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
check if you have mixed spaces and tabs.... –  avasal Dec 4 '12 at 11:08
    
Like I said in the description, I've already checked for that. This is not tab/space inconsistency. Updated question to highlight that part. –  Teekin Dec 4 '12 at 11:09
1  
Try typing ":set et", then ":retab", just in case. –  gg.kaspersky Dec 4 '12 at 11:17
6  
Cutting and pasting that exact code from your question does not produce an indentation error. –  Daniel Roseman Dec 4 '12 at 11:18
2  
@Heigi: could you upload the file in binary somewhere? I can't reproduce the IndentationError either. [I've seen certain things not survive pasting into SO.] –  DSM Dec 4 '12 at 12:16

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

UPDATE

I eventually found out why the problem occurred long after I found out how to get passed it. The problem occurred because I was piping input into the the Django shell. It was something to the effect of "./manage.py shell < some_file.py" although I don't remember the specifics of the environment. Today I'd create a custom Django command ([appname]/management/commands/some_command.py) and run ./manage.py some_command but at the time I had this problem, I wasn't aware of that option.

I suppose it has something to do with how the OS shell (for example Bash, not Django or Python) interprets spaces and tabs when piping text. I still find the reported location of the error strange.

What follows is my original response, frustration included.

Original response/solution

Well, that sure was frustrating. But I found the answer, silly as it is.

As we all know, it's perfectly okay to have empty lines between statements in Python. For instance, this should be okay:

if True:
    something = 'whatever'

    #the line above here does NOT contain spaces, it's just a newline
    another_thing = something

Except, as it turns out, sometimes Python decides that it matters, just out of spite.

Of course, when I asked the question, I had already tried (multiple times) to take out the empty line above the offending line, and I had also tried indenting it even though it shouldn't matter. Neither worked.

But the problem actually begins in the line below sys.stdout.write(' exists with status=' + result.status + '.'). That's what triggers the problem with the second empty line, which then in turns makes Python complain about the one below that, apparently because telling the developer about the correct line would be... too simple, I guess.

for uuid in uuids:
    sys.stdout.write('Checking \'' + uuid + '\'...')
    result = qp.get('v2/customer/' + uuid + '/')
    sys.stdout.write(' exists with status=' + result.status + '.')

    # The line above this comment must have "    "
    if result.status != 'S':
        sys.stdout.write(' Fixing... ')
        qp.put('v2/customer/' + uuid + '/', { 'status': 'S' })
        sys.stdout.write('done.')

    # The line above this comment must also have "    "
    sys.stdout.write('\n') # <- This is where Python, idiotically enough, complains.

This apparently just happens sometimes. I've never had to do this before and I don't know why Python wants it this way in this case.

Obviously, all of this is patently absurd, but there you go. That's the solution. If this happens to you, fill all the empty lines with indentation.

share|improve this answer
    
I can't reproduce needing to have a spaced line there in any version of Python; this is either a very obscure bug or you've misdiagnosed the problem. What does python -tt yourfilename.py return on your original code that doesn't work? –  DSM Dec 4 '12 at 12:57
    
Yeah, I'm sort of getting used to nobody believing a word I say when it comes to my Python problems, but I swear to God, the description in the question is correct, I am certain about the white spaces and I am certain that this is what fixed it. Those who don't believe me will just have to not believe me, I don't even care anymore. To me, it is clearly an obscure bug. –  Teekin Dec 4 '12 at 12:59
3  
It's certainly true that you could be 100% right and simply in the unfortunate position of (1) having a bug with symptoms which resemble a mistake we've all seen a million times, and (2) being unwilling to provide the necessary information for people to judge whether you're actually right or not. That's happened to me once before: I simply didn't have the time to give people the information they'd need to see I was right. (And I've got patches in Python core, so I'm certainly willing to believe in Python bugs.) But you shouldn't be surprised if people draw the simplest conclusion. –  DSM Dec 4 '12 at 13:12
    
I'm not surprised... I just thought I had made myself clear in the question and then pretty much everyone says things that I've already addressed time and time again. It's just one of those problems that's really hard to get help with, because it resembles such a fantastically common newbie mistake. The irony is that even before Python, I'm a complete and utter indentation nazi. Tab/space inconsistency never gets passed me and I refuse to use editors that offer any ambiguity. Please don't take my frustration personally, I really appreciate the help. That's why I'm here, after all. –  Teekin Dec 4 '12 at 13:20

It seems that you need to add spaces to your empty lines. You can observe this by trying the following code:

Does not work:

for uuid in uuids:
    sys.stdout.write('Checking \'' + uuid + '\'...')
    result = qp.get('v2/customer/' + uuid + '/')
    sys.stdout.write(' exists with status=' + result.status + '.')
#
    if (result.status != 'S'):
        sys.stdout.write(' Fixing... ')
        qp.put('v2/customer/' + uuid + '/', { 'status': 'S' })
        sys.stdout.write('done.')
#
    sys.stdout.write('\n') # <- This is where the error occurs

Works:

for uuid in uuids:
    sys.stdout.write('Checking \'' + uuid + '\'...')
    result = qp.get('v2/customer/' + uuid + '/')
    sys.stdout.write(' exists with status=' + result.status + '.')
    #
    if (result.status != 'S'):
        sys.stdout.write(' Fixing... ')
        qp.put('v2/customer/' + uuid + '/', { 'status': 'S' })
        sys.stdout.write('done.')
    #
    sys.stdout.write('\n') # <- This is where the error occurs

Possible explaination: Observe the difference in the indentation of the above codes at the two empty lines where I added comment symbols (#). It seems that lines containing only spaces are not handled properly by this website's editor. Indeed, If I recopy the same code as above (the one that works), I loose the indentation (once my answer is posted or in the preview window of the editor) at the 2 lines that used to contain only spaces. Try it for yourself:

Would expect this to work (but it does not):

for uuid in uuids:
    sys.stdout.write('Checking \'' + uuid + '\'...')
    result = qp.get('v2/customer/' + uuid + '/')
    sys.stdout.write(' exists with status=' + result.status + '.')

    if (result.status != 'S'):
        sys.stdout.write(' Fixing... ')
        qp.put('v2/customer/' + uuid + '/', { 'status': 'S' })
        sys.stdout.write('done.')

    sys.stdout.write('\n') # <- This is where the error occurs

This perhaps can be fixed by avoiding lines of code containing only white space when copying/posting question/answer from this website, though this is not very practicle. Eg:

Works again

for uuid in uuids:
    sys.stdout.write('Checking \'' + uuid + '\'...')
    result = qp.get('v2/customer/' + uuid + '/')
    sys.stdout.write(' exists with status=' + result.status + '.')
    if (result.status != 'S'):
        sys.stdout.write(' Fixing... ')
        qp.put('v2/customer/' + uuid + '/', { 'status': 'S' })
        sys.stdout.write('done.')
    sys.stdout.write('\n') # <- This is where the error occurs

I only presume what I am saying, and I know I might be wrong. Nevertheless, I hope this helps.

share|improve this answer
    
Yep, that's what it ended up being, as per the response I put in myself once I had figured it out. The strange thing is that I've never seen this being required in Python before. Hopefully one day I will find out why exactly it wants it this way this time. –  Teekin Dec 4 '12 at 14:23

This may be an odd problem with your text editor software.

I have experienced this in the past and to resolve I delete all the indentation and reindent with spaces, not tabs.

share|improve this answer
    
Already did. That's why they are spaces. :) –  Teekin Dec 4 '12 at 12:13
    
what editor are you using? –  rikAtee Dec 4 '12 at 12:17
    
Vim. I also tried various things with Sublime Text 2 (Mac OS) –  Teekin Dec 4 '12 at 12:34

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