Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a table that sometimes gets updated with records that miss a '0' or several consecutive zeroes. The records length should be 8 digits beyond the decimal point (10 characters in total).

For example - a record that originally looks like 1.12345600 will end up like 1.123456

I made a script that checks all the records length and adds to each record that is shorter than 10 characters a '0'.

The problem is that it only add a '0' once. The above example would look like 1.1234560 and not 1.12345600 as I want it. This is the script :

DECLARE

       CURSOR dif IS
            SELECT CUST_CODE, CUST_ID, CONTRACT_NUM, MSISDN 
            FROM project1;


BEGIN

        FOR a in dif LOOP

            IF LENGTH (a.CUST_CODE)<10
            THEN
            UPDATE project1
            SET CUST_CODE=a.CUST_CODE||'0'      
            WHERE CUST_CODE=a.CUST_CODE;
            END IF;
        END LOOP;
        commit;

END;

After it finishes running, a single '0' is added. If I'll run the script again, it will add another '0' to any records that is still shorter than 10 characters. Reocrds that have 7 characters would require running it a 3rd time.

I'm guessing there should be another loop somewhere to keep checking the records until it all reaches the required length. Any idea?

share|improve this question

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You can use rpad function: http://www.techonthenet.com/oracle/functions/rpad.php (the third example in the link is what you want).

 SET CUST_CODE=rpad(a.CUST_CODE, 10, '0')
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks so much! such a useful function (: –  Shlomix Dec 4 '12 at 12:36

If I were you I'd do it with a single statement.

UPDATE project1 SET CUST_CODE=rpad(CUST_CODE, 10, '0');
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you. indeed way more simple. im trying to practice plsql,so using any oppertunity to write stuff, although it seems like i better focus on sql first... thanks. –  Shlomix Dec 4 '12 at 13:26

If you want to implement it with SQL given above are the best ways but is you want to implement it via PLSQL you need to correct your logic. You are running the loop for the number of records retched in the cursor and then appending each one with a Single zero i.e. '0' which is exactly what you have written in code.

If you want it to make to length 10 then implement it as below.

             IF LENGTH (a.CUST_CODE)<10
        THEN
        v_len = 10-length (a.cust_code-- declare a variable
        for 
        i in 1..v_len
        loop
        v_pad=v_pad||'0';
        end loop;
        UPDATE project1
        SET CUST_CODE=a.CUST_CODE|| v_pad      
        WHERE CUST_CODE=a.CUST_CODE;
        END IF;

Hope this will help you to implement in PLSQL

share|improve this answer

You can use rpad to solve your problem! Below follow the reference documentation. http://docs.oracle.com/cd/B19306_01/server.102/b14200/functions140.htm

share|improve this answer
1  
Without a demonstration of how to use rpad this is just a comment, not an answer. –  Bob Gilmore Oct 23 '13 at 17:46
DECLARE

       CURSOR dif IS
            SELECT CUST_CODE, CUST_ID, CONTRACT_NUM, MSISDN 
            FROM project1;
v_temp number;

BEGIN

        FOR a in dif LOOP
v_temp := 10-LENGTH (a.CUST_CODE)
            IF LENGTH (a.CUST_CODE)<10
            THEN
            UPDATE project1
            SET CUST_CODE=RPAD(a.CUST_CODE,v_temp,'0') ;
            WHERE CUST_CODE=a.CUST_CODE;
            END IF;
        END LOOP;
        commit;

END;

You can use that above query

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.