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I need a script in bash to delete matched line of temp file with parent file.

file1:

India is great  
handd d  
hello  
Lionel Messi  
by  
Makbul Hussain 

file2:

is  
by  
Makbul  
d

The output should be like this:

hello  
by
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closed as not a real question by iiSeymour, casperOne Dec 5 '12 at 13:15

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

3  
What have you tried? –  imp25 Dec 4 '12 at 11:31
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2 Answers

I wouldn't write a script to do this, just sort and pipe through uniq -d:

$ sort f1.txt f2.txt | uniq -d
by  

Note: 'hello' is only in file1 and not in file2.

$ echo hello >> f2.txt                              # Append hello to f2.txt 

$ sort f1.txt f2.txt | uniq -d        
by  
hello

$ sort f1.txt f2.txt | uniq -d > new_parent.txt    # Create file with duplicates

Your wording suggests you want the opporsite of your example however:

delete matched line

$ sort f1.txt f2.txt | uniq -u
d
handd d  
India is great  
is  
Lionel Messi  
Makbul  
Makbul Hussain

The -u option for uniq shows only the unique lines.

The -d option for uniq shows only the duplicated lines.

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If you mean, find all lines in file2 that are also in file1, do this:

while read line; do
    grep "$line" file2
done < file1

Not sure how you'd want to get the "hello" out though....it's not in file2.

Alternatively, use comm as explained in this question.

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for line in $(cat file1.txt); do this is just terrible! Replace with while read line; do ...; done < file1.txt (and get rid of the IFS useless junk in your first line). –  gniourf_gniourf Dec 4 '12 at 12:12
    
@gniour_gniourf: That coin has two sides. Profiling will show that the messy for-loop is faster than the while with read (mainly due to the overhead of calling read so often, versus a single call to cat), whereas the while has a much cleaner syntax. Still, I edited your suggestion in, because the while version will likely indeed be more clear to the OP. –  Rody Oldenhuis Dec 4 '12 at 12:28
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