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I have this C code:

real_T addition(const struct_T parameters)
{
    return parameters.a + parameters.b;
}

typedef struct
{
    real_T a;
    real_T b;
} struct_T;

typedef double real_T;

I invoke it from C# like this:

using System.Runtime.InteropServices;

    namespace AdditionConsoleApplication
    {
        class Program
        {
            [DllImport(@"X:\Bla\Addition.dll", CallingConvention = CallingConvention.Cdecl)]
            public static extern double addition(struct_T parameters);

            static void Main(string[] args)
            {
                struct_T parameters = new struct_T();
                parameters.a = 1;
                parameters.b = 3;

                Console.WriteLine(addition(parameters));
            }
        }
    }

Here struct_T:

[StructLayout(LayoutKind.Sequential)]
class struct_T
{
    public double a;
    public double b;
}

Unfortunately, the math is not correct:

2.72645911468311E-284

Can anyone see something wrong?

share|improve this question
1  
Please don't change the question to fix the problem. You described a problem that the code in your edited version did not exhibit. That's very confusing. I reverted the question to its original form. –  David Heffernan Dec 4 '12 at 16:02

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You have this definition for the structure:

[StructLayout(LayoutKind.Sequential)]
class struct_T
{
    public double a;
    public double b;
}

The p/invoke marshaller will marshal classes by reference. In other words, a pointer to the object is passed to the native code. This mismatch explains why the program fails.

The solution is to make sure that both sides of the interface match. One way is to pass by value on both sides. A simple way to achieve that is to declare the structure to be a value type in C#. Do that by making it a struct:

[StructLayout(LayoutKind.Sequential)]
struct struct_T
{
    public double a;
    public double b;
}

The other way would be to pass by reference at both sides. You would achieve that by using class on the C# side and changing the C code.

real_T addition(const struct_T* parameters)
{
    return parameters->a + parameters->b;
}
share|improve this answer
    
I don't think my answer is that bad, since I've mentioned both misalignment and non-symmetric interface. Anyways, I'll delete the answer - there's too much mess. –  Viktor Latypov Dec 4 '12 at 17:06
    
@Viktor The bulk of your answer discussed packing which is simply a non-issue here. That struct's layout is the same for all packing options! But if no packing specified then both sides match. It was very misleading. The talk about struct vs class was pretty much hidden. That's the only issue here. –  David Heffernan Dec 4 '12 at 17:12

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