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I have two files: allinfo.txt and chr1.txt.

allinfo.txt looks like

rs4477212    1   82154       A   A
rs3094315    1   752566      G   A 
rs3131972    1   752721      A   G 
rs12124819   1   776546      A   G  

while chr1.txt looks like

rs4477212    1   82154       A  A
rs3094315    1   752566      A  G
rs3131972    1   752721      A  G
rs12124819   1   776546      A  A

Although the two files look quite similar, they are actually very different in terms of the information they carry. However, very basically, what I want to do is this: for each row in allinfo, I want to take the letter in the fourth column and search the corresponding row in chr1 for that letter and count the number of times it comes up. If it comes up twice, I want to attach 1 0 0 (three columns) to that row of allinfo. If it comes up only once, I want to attach 0 1 0 (again, three columns) to that row of allinfo. If it doesn't come up, I want to attach 0 0 1 to that row of allinfo. If I could actually do this, I should get the following:

rs4477212    1   82154       A   A  1 0 0
rs3094315    1   752566      G   A  0 1 0
rs3131972    1   752721      A   G  0 1 0
rs12124819   1   776546      A   G  1 0 0

First note that the first five columns are just what was already in the allinfo.txt file. Since chr1 has two A's in the first row, then I must have attached 1 0 0 to the first row. Looking at the second row, since chr1 only has one G in the second row, then I must have attached 0 1 0 to the second row. The rest follows similarly.

My code so far:

#!/usr/bin/perl

use strict;
use warnings;

use File::Slurp;

use Data::Dumper;

open(FILE, '<', 'test_chr1_allinfo.txt');

my @array = read_file('test_chr1.txt');

my %hash;
while (<FILE>)
{
    (my $rs, my $chr, my $bp, my $a0, my $a1) = split(" ");
    my $line = $.;
    my $allele = $a0;
    $hash{$line} = $allele;
}   


foreach my $item (keys %hash)
{
...
}

As you can tell, I'm not exactly sure how I'm going to go about the foreach loop. I constructed my hash by taking the key to be the line number of the first allele in that row and assigning it to the first allele listed in the row. I was then going to run through my hash and for each item, look at the specific row in chr1 and count how many times that allele comes up. Depending on that number, I can figure out where to put the 1 in the three columns I need. However, I have no idea how to code this since I just started learning Perl for this project. Anyone have any ideas?

Another question I had was this: when I print my hash so I can see what's in it, why is it all jumbled up? By how I constructed it, I expected it to look like

1 => A
2 => G
3 => A
4 => A

However, I get something like

4 => A
2 => G
3 => A
1 => A

Why is this happening?

Thanks in advance for any suggestions/advice/help!

share|improve this question
    
The order of the hashes are not guranteed. The order of the hash need not be in the same order in which it was created. –  Guru Dec 4 '12 at 11:39
    
Interesting. Is there any reason why this is the case? –  Peter Dec 4 '12 at 11:40
    
Unlike arrays which are stored in contiguous locations, hashes are scattered in the memory. –  Guru Dec 4 '12 at 11:42
    
@Peter: It makes the lookup faster. –  choroba Dec 4 '12 at 11:42
    
@Peter: Do the files correspond to each other line by line? –  choroba Dec 4 '12 at 11:44

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

This code meets your requirements. Note that only the last columns are used, since the rest is not important for the task. If you in fact had more chr* files to process, slurping allinfo.txt would make sense. In such a case, instead of printing the output, you will have to remember the three numbers in an array and add 1 appropriatelly in the ifs/elses (e.g. as @counts[$.][0]++).

#!/usr/bin/perl
use warnings;
use strict;

open my $ALL, '<', 'allinfo.txt' or die $!;
open my $CHR, '<', 'chr1.txt'    or die $!;

while (<$ALL>) {
    chomp;
    my @alleles_all = (split)[-2, -1];
    chomp(my $chr = <$CHR>); # Reads both files line by simultaneously.
    my @alleles_chr = (split ' ', $chr)[-2, -1];
    if ($alleles_chr[0] eq $alleles_chr[1]) {
        if ($alleles_chr[0] eq $alleles_all[0]) {
            print "$_\t1\t0\t0\n";
        } else {
            print "$_\t0\t0\t1\n";
        }
    } else {
        print "$_\t0\t1\t0\n";
    }
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Thank you! Man, this makes complete sense to me...but why couldn't I do it myself... –  Peter Dec 4 '12 at 17:39

This will do the trick

use strict;
use warnings;

open my $all, '<', 'allinfo.txt' or die $!;
open my $chr1, '<', 'chr1.txt' or die $!;

while (my $line = <$all>) {

  chomp $line;
  my $f4 = (split ' ', $line)[3];

  my $line2 = <$chr1>;
  my $n = grep $_ eq $f4, (split ' ', $line2)[3, 4];

  my @newline = ($line, 0, 0, 0);
  $newline[-($n+1)] = 1;
  print "@newline\n";
}

output

rs4477212    1   82154       A   A  1 0 0
rs3094315    1   752566      G   A  0 1 0
rs3131972    1   752721      A   G  0 1 0
rs12124819   1   776546      A   G  1 0 0
share|improve this answer

Here's another option:

use Modern::Perl;
use File::Slurp qw/read_file/;

my %patterns = ( 0 => "0\t0\t1", 1 => "0\t1\t0", 2 => "1\t0\t0" );

chomp( my @allinfo = read_file 'allinfo.txt' );
my @chr1 = read_file 'chr1.txt';

for my $i ( 0 .. $#allinfo ) {
    my $allinfoCol3 = ( split ' ', $allinfo[$i] )[3];
    my ($chr1Cols) = $chr1[$i] =~ /(\S+\s+\S+)$/;
    my $count = () = $chr1Cols =~ /$allinfoCol3/g;
    say "$allinfo[$i]\t$patterns{$count}";
}

Output:

rs4477212    1   82154       A   A  1   0   0
rs3094315    1   752566      G   A  0   1   0
rs3131972    1   752721      A   G  0   1   0
rs12124819   1   776546      A   G  1   0   0
share|improve this answer

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