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As shown in the title:

let (+) x y z = x + y + z in 5+6 7

Why is this expression wrong?

The error says Error: This expression is not a function; it cannot be applied. But what I see is a function, it just redefine the operator of +.

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1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Because you're trying to call 6 with the argument 7 and 6 is not a function. Try

let (+) x y z = x + y + z in (5 + 6) 7
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Why adding a () can let it work? –  Jackson Tale Dec 4 '12 at 12:16
1  
@JacksonTale Why is 1 + 2 * 3 different from (1 + 2) * 3? –  melpomene Dec 4 '12 at 12:18
    
Ok, I get it. So when OCaml tries to solve 5 + 6 7, it first find out there is a space between 6 and 7, so it guesses it might be a function. function has the highest priority, so 6 7 gets served first, but it can't, because 6 is not a function. Am I right? –  Jackson Tale Dec 4 '12 at 12:19
3  
It doesn't guess and it doesn't care about spaces either: (6)7 is still a function call. Function application simply has a higher priority than any (infix) operator, so a b ? c d is always parsed as (a b) ? (c d) for all operators ? and values a, b, c, d. –  melpomene Dec 4 '12 at 12:22
    
But how does OCaml know it is a possible function call? –  Jackson Tale Dec 4 '12 at 12:23

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