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I need to storage raw (not aggregated) data which has multiple segmentation (aggregation) possibilities. On example: day, hour of a day, device etc. There will be at least 6 segmentation columns and every column has average 5 unique values. And I need to manage every possible aggregation of this data on wide variety of ranges.

On example:

  • I need sum of columnX grouped by day and hour of a day from last month
  • I need sum of columnX, average of columnY grouped by month and device from last year

It has to be raw data. This requirement will cause average 100M records per month. I can't store any sums because I had to store every possible sum for every combination of segmentation columns.

What database engine / design would be most optimal for such a task? Originally for application we chose MySQL database but in time of choice we wasn't fully aware about data structure and statistics needed to extract. Now when I know it I thought about table partitioning but I'm not familiar with it and not sure if it really helps because of wide variety of ranges. And if it doesn't help, if MySQL fail this task, no matter of table design, what do? Some non-relational engine like MongoDB on example?

Requirement for queries - not more than 2-3 seconds.

supposed company hardware resources for database handling - couple of high quality servers but for sure not dozens or hundreds.

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2 Answers 2

What I've found to work best is storing raw data not in any kind of database, but storing the aggregates of what you're looking to query in those systems. The reason around this is raw data is clunky, and searching over potentially 100m rows coming in a day is going to generate a HUGE latency issue regardless of what you're searching with especially if you have the entire raw data set in. You want these log files though so you can aggregate over it to produce the results you want.

I've found storing these logs as the HTTP requests works, or even writing something to store raw JSON files helps take the second level to it.

For example, I see you want to do a Devices group. You could use Mongo to aggregate this out into something similar to the below structure:

{
    "_id": "20121005_siteKey_device",
    "hits": 512,
    "hours": {
        "0": 52,
        "1": 31
    }
} //mongo structure

Or if you wanted to aggragate further down to minutes:

{
    "_id": "20121005_siteKey_device",
    "hits": 512,
    "minutes": {
        "0": 52,
        "1": 31
        ...
        "3600":31
    }
}

Aside from this if you have much smaller dataset you could look to use Redis. Take a peak at this link here:

Metrics using Redis

Regardless a fun problem to work through. Good Luck!

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You could store the aggregates grouped by Hour, Device, .... In other words, grouped by all interesting dimensions together. If there are few distinct combinations (you said there are), this aggregated table will be small. You can then query the aggregates (aggregating again, of course) instead of scanning the huge base table.

Note, that NoSQL databases don't do things fundamentally differently. You'll have all the same problems with this task. You either need to scan the entire table or store aggregates. This will be the same for SQL Server and for NoSQL.

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