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I have a problem with std::map performance. In my C++ project I have a list of GUIObjects which also includes Windows. I draw everything in for loop, like this:

unsigned int guiObjectListSize = m_guiObjectList.size();
for(unsigned int i = 0; i < guiObjectListSize; i++)
{
    GUIObject* obj = m_guiObjectList[i];
    if(obj->getParentId() < 0)
    obj->draw();                                
}

In this case when I run a project, it works smoothly. I have 4 windows and few other components like buttons etc.

But I would like to take care of drawing windows separately, so after modifications, my code looks like this:

// Draw all objects except windows
unsigned int guiObjectListSize = m_guiObjectList.size();
for(unsigned int i = 0; i < guiObjectListSize; i++)
{
    GUIObject* obj = m_guiObjectList[i];
    if((obj->getParentId() < 0) && (dynamic_cast<Window*>(obj) == nullptr))
        obj->draw();        // GUIManager should only draw objects which don't have parents specified
                            // And those that aren't instances of Window class
                            // Rest objects will be drawn by their parents
                            // But only if that parent is able to draw children (i.e. Window or Layout)
}

// Now draw windows
for(int i = 1; i <= m_windowList.size(); i++)
{
    m_windowList[i]->draw(); // m_windowList is a map!
}

So I created a std::map<int, Window*>, because I need z-indexes of Windows to be set as keys in a map. But the problem is that when I run this code, it's really slow. Even though I have only 4 windows (map size is 4), I can see that fps rate is very low. I can't say an exact number, because I don't have such counter implemented yet.

Could anyone tell me why this approach is so slow?

share|improve this question
1  
Are you certain it isn't the dynamic_cast which is slow? –  Agentlien Dec 4 '12 at 12:24
    
avoid dynamic_cast, particularly in a loop –  codablank1 Dec 4 '12 at 12:25
    
@Agentlien Yes, I tried removing this dynamic_cast condition in if statement and leaving map content drawing (so there were 2x more of windows drawn, but yet this number, 8, isn't very large amount), but it was still very slow. –  Piotr Chojnacki Dec 4 '12 at 12:27
4  
Use profiler and look where is actual bottleneck –  Denis Ermolin Dec 4 '12 at 12:29
2  
Why is m_windowList a map? You are indexing by an integer rather than something more complex, and the indices are dense (apparently from 1 to size()-1, inclusive). That suggests a vector or a deque. With a vector, your m_windowList[i] is an O(1) operation. With a map, it's an O(log(n)) operation. –  David Hammen Dec 4 '12 at 14:04

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

This is what virtual functions are for. Not only do you eliminate the slow dynamic_cast, but you get a more flexible type check.

// Draw all objects except windows
unsigned int guiObjectListSize = m_guiObjectList.size();
for(unsigned int i = 0; i < guiObjectListSize; i++)
{
    GUIObject* obj = m_guiObjectList[i];
    if(obj->getParentId() < 0)
        obj->drawFirstChance();
}

// Now draw windows
for(int i = 1; i <= m_windowList.size(); i++)
{
    m_windowList[i]->drawSecondChance();
}

Where drawFirstChance doesn't do anything for windows and other floating objects.

The next optimization opportunity is to make the window list a vector and perform z-order sorting only when it changes (assuming windows are created/destroyed/reordered much less often than they are drawn).

share|improve this answer

The problem with this code doesn't seem to be with the use of std::map. Instead, the bottleneck is rather the use of dynamic_cast, which is a very expensive operation as it needs to wander through the inheritance tree of the given class.

This tree is most likely rather large for your GUI components, which would definitely explain why doing so in each iteration slows down the approach as a whole.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for the answer Agentlien, but as I replied to your comment - I tried removing this dynamic_cast condition in if statement and leaving map content drawing (so there were 2x more of windows drawn, but yet this number, 8, isn't very large amount), but it was still very slow. –  Piotr Chojnacki Dec 4 '12 at 12:29
    
I saw that just after I had posted my answer. Have you tried simply commenting out the draw() code? –  Agentlien Dec 4 '12 at 12:31
    
If I comment out draw() for map content, it works perfectly fine. –  Piotr Chojnacki Dec 4 '12 at 12:34
1  
That seems to indicate that the actual problem is in the draw call, rather than the map you store them in, no? –  Agentlien Dec 4 '12 at 12:35

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