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There are three threads and autoreset event. While second and third threads are waiting on this event, first one calls SetEvent twice. Does system guarantee that both waiting threads will wake up?

I've read in MSDN this note for .NET Framework AutoResetEvent Class: There is no guarantee that every call to the Set method will release a thread. If two calls are too close together, so that the second call occurs before a thread has been released, only one thread is released. It is as if the second call did not happen.

Is it correct for Win32 API?

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1 Answer 1

Consider the following scenarios:

Event Signaled | Thread 1   | Thread 2      | Thread 3
---------------------------------------------------------
false          | SetEvent() |               |            
true           |            |               |            
true           |            | Wait Complete |            
false          |            |               |            
false          | SetEvent() |               |            
true           |            |               |            
true           |            |               | Wait Complete
false          |            |               |            

Success

Event Signaled | Thread 1   | Thread 2      | Thread 3
---------------------------------------------------------
false          | SetEvent() |               |            
true           |            |               |  
true           | SetEvent() |               |            
true           |            |               |            
true           |            | Wait Complete |            
false          |            |               |            
false          |            |               | Wait does not complete
false          |            |               |    

Failed

Depending on which thread gets to execute at a particular time, you may or may not complete the wait on the other threads.

You should change the event to a manual reset event to guarantee all threads will complete their waits, and use ResetEvent to set the event back to nonsignaled when you need to.

There are other options, such as using a semaphore to control the access, or a critical section if you plan on only waiting a short amount of time (spin lock performance), but a manual reset event seems like the way to go. In general, check out synchronization objects.

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1  
+1, There are other failure mechanisms with ARE - thread 2 may run twice, running thorough its code and looping back, hitting the ARE again and consuming both waits. A MRE would set all waiting threads ready at once, which is fine if all the threads are waiting. A similar issue would affect a shared semaphore - if the threads are looping, sending two units to the semaphore does not guarantee that each thread runs once. If the requirement is that all other threads are to run exactly as many times as thread 1 signals, I suspect that an array of semaphores is the only way to be sure. –  Martin James Dec 4 '12 at 13:44
    
+1 for Martin James. You make some good points. Perhaps the OP would want to use an array of auto reset events (one for each thread), and loop through and signal them all in 'thread 1'. –  parrowdice Dec 4 '12 at 13:53

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