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While I was making a logic to iterate two enumerables, with different types, through a comparison, I found this:

class Program
{
    public static IEnumerable<mm> YieldlyGet()
    {
        yield return new mm { Int = 0 };
        yield return new mm { Int = 1 };
        yield return new mm { Int = 2 };
        yield return new mm { Int = 3 };
        yield return new mm { Int = 4 };
        yield return new mm { Int = 5 };
    }

    public static IEnumerable<int> YieldlyGetInt()
    {
        yield return 0;
        yield return 1;
        yield return 2;
        yield return 3;
        yield return 4;
        yield return 5;
    }

    public static IEnumerable<int> Get() 
    {
        return new List<int> { 0, 1,2,3,4,5 };
    }

    static void Main(string[] args) 
    {
        var yieldr = YieldlyGet().GetEnumerator();
        var yieldv = YieldlyGetInt().GetEnumerator();

        var list = Get().GetEnumerator();

        int i = -1;
        Console.WriteLine("For the current index: {0}", ++i);
        Console.WriteLine("y-r: Should I move next? {0}, if yes, value: {1}", yieldr.MoveNext(), yieldr.Current != null ? yieldr.Current.Int : 0);
        Console.WriteLine("y-v: Should I move next? {0}, if yes, value: {1}", yieldv.MoveNext(), yieldv.Current);
        Console.WriteLine("l: Should I move next? {0}, if yes, value: {1}", list.MoveNext(), list.Current);

        Console.WriteLine("For the current index: {0}", ++i);
        Console.WriteLine("y-r: Should I move next? {0}, if yes, value: {1}", yieldr.MoveNext(), yieldr.Current != null ? yieldr.Current.Int : 0);
        Console.WriteLine("y-v: Should I move next? {0}, if yes, value: {1}", yieldv.MoveNext(), yieldv.Current);
        Console.WriteLine("l: Should I move next? {0}, if yes, value: {1}", list.MoveNext(), list.Current);

        Console.WriteLine("For the current index: {0}", ++i);
        Console.WriteLine("y-r: Should I move next? {0}, if yes, value: {1}", yieldr.MoveNext(), yieldr.Current != null ? yieldr.Current.Int : 0);
        Console.WriteLine("y-v: Should I move next? {0}, if yes, value: {1}", yieldv.MoveNext(), yieldv.Current);
        Console.WriteLine("l: Should I move next? {0}, if yes, value: {1}", list.MoveNext(), list.Current);

        Console.WriteLine("For the current index: {0}", ++i);
        Console.WriteLine("y-r: Should I move next? {0}, if yes, value: {1}", yieldr.MoveNext(), yieldr.Current != null ? yieldr.Current.Int : 0);
        Console.WriteLine("y-v: Should I move next? {0}, if yes, value: {1}", yieldv.MoveNext(), yieldv.Current);
        Console.WriteLine("l: Should I move next? {0}, if yes, value: {1}", list.MoveNext(), list.Current);

        Console.WriteLine("For the current index: {0}", ++i);
        Console.WriteLine("y-r: Should I move next? {0}, if yes, value: {1}", yieldr.MoveNext(), yieldr.Current != null ? yieldr.Current.Int : 0);
        Console.WriteLine("y-v: Should I move next? {0}, if yes, value: {1}", yieldv.MoveNext(), yieldv.Current);
        Console.WriteLine("l: Should I move next? {0}, if yes, value: {1}", list.MoveNext(), list.Current);

        Console.WriteLine("For the current index: {0}", ++i);
        Console.WriteLine("y-r: Should I move next? {0}, if yes, value: {1}", yieldr.MoveNext(), yieldr.Current != null ? yieldr.Current.Int : 0);
        Console.WriteLine("y-v: Should I move next? {0}, if yes, value: {1}", yieldv.MoveNext(), yieldv.Current);
        Console.WriteLine("l: Should I move next? {0}, if yes, value: {1}", list.MoveNext(), list.Current);

        Console.WriteLine("For the current index: {0}", ++i);
        Console.WriteLine("y-r: Should I move next? {0}, if yes, value: {1}", yieldr.MoveNext(), yieldr.Current != null ? yieldr.Current.Int : 0);
        Console.WriteLine("y-v: Should I move next? {0}, if yes, value: {1}", yieldv.MoveNext(), yieldv.Current);
        Console.WriteLine("l: Should I move next? {0}, if yes, value: {1}", list.MoveNext(), list.Current);


        Console.ReadLine();
}

The thing is that, when I am after the last position, the list presents me with the default, whilst the yield created Iterator, keeps showing the last value.

For the current index: 6
y-r: Should I move next? False, if yes, value: 5
y-v: Should I move next? False, if yes, value: 5
l: Should I move next? False, if yes, value: 0

Why?

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Let's look what happen in enumerator, which used by List<T> class (this is a List<int>.Enumerator). Actually msdn says that current value will be undefined, but we can analyze Framework 4.0 implementation. So, when enumerator is positioned after last element MoveNextRare will be called:

public bool MoveNext()
{
    List<T> ts = this.list;
    if (this.version != ts._version || this.index >= ts._size)
    {
        return this.MoveNextRare();
    }
    else
    {
        this.current = ts._items[this.index];
        List<T>.Enumerator<T> enumerator = this;
        enumerator.index = enumerator.index + 1;
        return true;
    }
}

Thus list is valid (unchanged) this method returns defaut(T) value (which is 0 for int)

private bool MoveNextRare()
{
    if (this.version != this.list._version)
        trow new InvalidOperationException();

    this.index = this.list._size + 1;
    this.current = default(T);
    return false;
}

What about generated enumerators? C# generates enumerator class, which will have states for each yield return statements. Moving to next state sets Current value for this enumerator:

bool MoveNext()
{
    bool flag;
    int state = this.state;
    if (state == 0)
    {
        this.state = -1;
        this.current = 0;
        this.state = 1;
        flag = true;
    }
    else if (state == 1)
    {
        this.state = -1;
        this.current = 1;
        this.state = 2;
        flag = true;
    }
    // ...
    else if (state == 5)
    {
        this.state = -1;
        this.current = 5;
        this.state = 6;
        flag = true;
    }
    else if (state == 6)
    {
        this.state = -1;
        flag = false;
        return flag;
    }
    else
    {
        flag = false;
        return flag;
    }
    return flag;
    flag = false;
    return flag;
}

What is interesting here is that this.current is not changed, after last assignment (when state was 5). That's why all subsequent calls to Current will return value, which was set by last yield return call.

share|improve this answer
    
sorry to ask, but, where did you take the generated source code of the yield enumerator? –  NoProblemBabe Dec 4 '12 at 16:38
    
@NoProblemBabe usually I use Reflector for that, but this sources decompiled by Telerik's JustDecompile. Just turn on option Show compiler generated types and members and add your dll or exe to JustDecompile –  Sergey Berezovskiy Dec 4 '12 at 16:42
    
JustDecompile, eh? Thanks gonna search for it –  NoProblemBabe Dec 4 '12 at 16:44

Per the MSDN documentation on the IEnumerator<T>.Current property:

Current is undefined [when]: The last call to MoveNext returned false, which indicates the end of the collection.

This means that underlying implementations of the enumerator are at liberty to return any arbitrary value from Current once MoveNext returns false. It could be 0, 6, -1, 2147483647, or just values picked at random; at any rate, you're expected not to use it.

share|improve this answer
    
Well, in this case I think that this is a very broad explanation from microsoft. While you understand it can be anything, I understand is the default value, null, 0 or whatever is the default value of the given type. –  NoProblemBabe Dec 4 '12 at 16:08

It is up to inherited IEnumerator realizations. For list there are realization of Enumerator that describe this:

[Serializable]
    public struct Enumerator : IEnumerator<T>, IDisposable, IEnumerator
    {
      private List<T> list;
      private int index;
      private int version;
      private T current;

      public T Current
      {
        get
        {
          return this.current;
        }
      }

      ....

      internal Enumerator(List<T> list)
      {
        this.list = list;
        this.index = 0;
        this.version = list._version;
        this.current = default (T); //there are default of T
      }

      ....
    }

For yield realization is different. It returns last value (cause current is not changed on next).

This difference can be due to this code was written by different people in different time. This behaviour is not defined and moreover, if you use IEnumerables properly, you should not see this behaviour (cause in general people don't use Enumerator.Next() explicitly but use foreach, linq or direct access by index (for arrays)).

share|improve this answer
1  
It would be nice to see some comments, not only decompiled sources :) –  Sergey Berezovskiy Dec 4 '12 at 12:46
    
I suppose you make a solid point, and as you, I figured something quite similar. I was puzzled by is why such odd behavior? –  NoProblemBabe Dec 4 '12 at 16:09
1  
It can be due to this code was written by different people in different time. This behaviour is not defined and moreover, if you use IEnumerables properly, you should not see this behaviour (cause in general people don't use Enumerator.Next() explicitly but use foreach, linq or direct access by index (for arrays)). –  Kirill Bestemyanov Dec 4 '12 at 16:15
    
But I suppose that in order to ms admit that it was an error, or miscmunicaion, and that they could've generated the last statement with 'this.Current = default(T);', I would've to travel a great distance and fight a very brave war. And I am felling a little lazy, right now. –  NoProblemBabe Dec 4 '12 at 16:36
    
I believe you are very right, Kirill. It might got done in another time and got forgotten due the lack of an explict use of move next. –  NoProblemBabe Dec 4 '12 at 16:40

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