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This is out of curiosity I want to ask this question...

Here is my code:

for (int i = 0; i < myList.Count - 1; ++i)
{
    for (int j = i+1; j < myList.Count; ++j)
    {
        DoMyStuff(myList[i], myList[j]);
    }
}

Pretty simple loop, but obviously it only works with List... But I was wondering... how can I code this loop in order to make it independent of the collection's type (deriving from IEnumerable...) My first thought:

IEnumerator it1 = myList.GetEnumerator();
while (it1.MoveNext())
{
    IEnumerator it2 = it1; // this part is obviously wrong
    while (it2.MoveNext())
    {
        DoMyStuff(it1.Current, it2.Current);
    }
}
share|improve this question

Because enumerators don't have an efficient way of getting the n'th element, your best bet is to copy the enumerable into a list, then use your existing code:

void CrossMap<T>(IEnumerable<T> enumerable)
{
    List<T> myList = enumerable.ToList();

    for (int i = 0; i < myList.Count - 1; ++i)
    {
        for (int j = i+1; j < myList.Count; ++j)
        {
            DoMyStuff(myList[i], myList[j]);
        }
    }
}

However, there is a rather tricksie hack you can do with some collection types. Because the enumerators of some of the collection types in the BCL are declared as value types, rather than reference types, you can create an implicit clone of the state of an enumerator by copying it to another variable:

// notice the struct constraint!
void CrossMap<TEnum, T>(TEnum enumerator) where TEnum : struct, IEnumerator<T>
{
    while (enumerator.MoveNext())
    {
        TEnum enum2 = enumerator;    // value type, so this makes an implicit clone!
        while (enum2.MoveNext())
        {
            DoMyStuff(enumerator.Current, enum2.Current);
        }
    }
}

// to use (you have to specify the type args exactly)
List<int> list = Enumerable.Range(0, 10).ToList();
CrossMap<List<int>.Enumerator, int>(list.GetEnumerator());

This is quite obtuse, and quite hard to use, so you should only do this if this is performance and space-critical.

share|improve this answer
1  
I would suggest using Array instead of List. – Jakub Konecki Dec 4 '12 at 13:10
    
If you're going to change the type, you might as well change it to an array instead of a list. Less memory, and quicker access. – Maarten Dec 4 '12 at 13:10
1  
I prefer to use List<T> rather than an array. ToArray requires an array the exact size of the enumerable, whereas ToList just puts all the elements in a list. This requires extra copying. Check the implementation of System.Linq.Buffer – thecoop Dec 4 '12 at 13:16
    
Your second solution is what I was looking for, thanks. I guess I didn't ask the good question, which should be: Why can't we easily clone IEnumerator? And I found a few posts talking about that... – s0ubap Dec 4 '12 at 13:35
    
@s0ubap: Because it's simply not part of the contract of IEnumerator - it doesn't have a method declared on the interface to clone it. You could check whether the enumerator implements ICloneable (like Array's enumerator does), but there's no standard way of cloning an enumerator. – thecoop Dec 4 '12 at 13:46

Here is a way that will truly use the lazy IEnumerable paradigm to generate a stream of non-duplicated combinations from a single IEnumerable input. The first pair will return immediately (no cacheing of lists), but there will be increasing delays (still imperceptible except for very high values of n or very expensive IEnumerables) during the Skip(n) operation which occurs after every move forward on the outer enumerator:

public static IEnumerable<Tuple<T, T>> Combinate<T>(this IEnumerable<T> enumerable) {
    var outer = enumerable.GetEnumerator();
    var n = 1;
    while (outer.MoveNext()) {
        foreach (var item in enumerable.Skip(n))
            yield return Tuple.Create(outer.Current, item);
        n++;
    }
}

Here is how you would use it in your case:

foreach(var pair in mySource.Combinate())
    DoMyStuff(pair.Item1, pair.Item2);

Postscript

Everyone has pointed out (here and elsewhere) that there is no efficient way of getting the "nth" element of an IEnumerable. This is partly because IEnumerable does not require there to even be an underlying source collection. For example, here's a silly little function that that dynamically generates values for an experiment as quickly as they can be consumed, and continues for a specified period of time rather than for any count:

public static IEnumerable<double> Sample(double milliseconds, Func<double> generator) {
    var sw = new Stopwatch();
    var timeout = TimeSpan.FromMilliseconds(milliseconds);
    sw.Start();
    while (sw.Elapsed < timeout)
        yield return generator();
}
share|improve this answer

There are extension methods Count() and ElementAt(int) that are declared on IEnumerable<T>. They are declared in the System.Linq namespace, which should be included by default in your .cs files if you are using any C# version later than C# 3. That means that you could you just do:

for (int i = 0; i < myList.Count() - 1; ++i)
{
  for (int j = i+1; j < myList.Count(); ++j)
  {
    DoMyStuff(myList.ElementAt(i), myList.ElementAt(j));
  }
}

However, note that these are methods, and will be called over and over again during iteration, so you might want to save their result to variables, like:

var elementCount = myList.Count();
for (int i = 0; i < elementCount - 1; ++i)
{
  var iElement = myList.ElementAt(i);
  for (int j = i+1; j < elementCount; ++j)
  {
    DoMyStuff(iElement, myList.ElementAt(j));
  }
}

You could also try some LINQ that will select all pair of elements that are eligible, and then use simple foreach to call the processing, something like:

var result = myList.SelectMany((avalue, aindex) => 
               myList.Where((bvalue, bindex) => aindex < bindex)
                     .Select(bvalue => new {First = avalue, Second = bvalue}));

foreach (var item in result)
{
  DoMyStuff(item.First, item.Second);
}
share|improve this answer

I'd write against IEnumerable<T> and pass a delegate for the indexing operation:

public static void DoStuff<T>(IEnumerable<T> seq, Func<int, T> selector)
{
    int count = seq.Count();
    for (int i = 0; i < count - 1; ++i)
    {
        for (int j = i+1; j < count; ++j)
        {
            DoMyStuff(selector(i), selector(j));
        }
    }
}

You can call it using:

List<T> list = //whatever
DoStuff(list, i => list[i]);

If you restrict the collection argument to ICollection<T> you can use the Count property instead of using the Count() extension method.

share|improve this answer

Not really efficient, but readable:

int i = 0;
foreach( var item1 in myList)
{
    ++i;
    foreach( var item2 in myList.Skip(i))
        DoMyStuff(item1, item2);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Argh you beat me by a minute. :) I think this approach is likely to be fastest for smaller lists. – Matthew Watson Dec 4 '12 at 13:36

You can do it fairly succinctly using IEnumerable.Skip(), and it might even be fairly fast compared with copying the list into an array IF the list is short enough. It's bound to be a lot slower than the copying for lists of a sufficient size, though.

You'd have to do some timings with lists of various sizes to see where copying to an array becomes more efficient.

Here's the code. Note that it's iterating an enumerable twice - which will be ok if the enumerable is implemented correctly!

static void test(IEnumerable<int> myList)
{
    int n = 0;

    foreach (int v1 in myList)
    {
        foreach (int v2 in myList.Skip(++n))
        {
            DoMyStuff(v1, v2);
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer

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