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i want to refer to a range in a different book, that is defined from this works:

lookRange = Range(Cells(startrow, startcol), Cells(rows, cols))
colno = Application.Match(myName, lookRange, 0)

but i don't want to activate the other sheet so i tried it to add the workbook&sheet to the range definition:

lookRange = Workbooks(filename).Sheets(sheetname).Range(Cells(startrow, startcol), Sheets(Cells(rows, cols))

sadly, this results in in a 1004 error (application-defined or object-defined error).

any ideas how to solve this?

thanx, Gijs.

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2 Answers 2

You don't need to activate the workbook / worksheet. Use the "Set" keyword to define a range.

The syntax would be something like:

dim rLookRange as Range

set rLookRange = Workbooks(filename).Sheets(sheetname).Range(Cells(startrow, startcol), Cells(rows, cols))

Depending on what you want to do (?)
For comparing ranges, I usually define arrays and compare the values inside these arrays.

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The calls to Cells will refer to the active worksheet and not to Workbook(filename).Sheets(sheetname) Better would be With Workbook(filename).Sheets(sheetname) ... Set rLookRange = .Range(.Cells(...), .Cells(...))... End With – barrowc Dec 6 '12 at 3:57

You can try first make reference to worksheet:

Dim Ws As Worksheet
Set Ws =  Workbooks(filename).Sheets(sheetname)

And then make reference to range:

With Ws
    Set rLookRange = Range(.Cells(startrow, startcol), .Cells(rows, cols))
End With

Pay attention on dots: you refer to Cells in specific Worksheet, so paste dots before .Cells in your statement.

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