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I'm having a problem regarding a char type variable in my program. I don't post the code because it is too long but this is roughly what I want to do:

#include ...

char path[100];

int main()
{
    char path[100] = "C:/......";

    [...]

    out = function();
}

int function()
{
    [...]
    imwrite(path,image);
    [...]

} 

The problem is that my path variable seems to be lost somehow because if I try cout < < path before imwrite in function it doesen't print anything as if path was empty.

What should I do forbeing able to access my path variable in function?

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1  
if this is c++, you should be using std::string for your strings. –  crashmstr Dec 4 '12 at 13:34
1  
global path and the one you initialize in main are different variables. Read a decent book on C programming before you go any further –  user1773602 Dec 4 '12 at 13:35
1  
@alvinleetya, with std::string, why would you need strcat? Just use the + operator to add, = to assign. When you need to pass a const character pointer (C style string), use .c_str(). –  crashmstr Dec 4 '12 at 13:40
1  
@alvinleetya, to concatenate std::strings you can simply use + : std::string s = s1+s2 and not bother about memory allocation –  user1773602 Dec 4 '12 at 13:41
1  
You can get a const char* from a std::string using std::string::c_str() –  icabod Dec 4 '12 at 13:49

2 Answers 2

You're defining a global variable path (in global scope) and a local variable path in main(). This means that inside main(), path refers to the local one, while in function(), it refers to the global one.

If the path is hardcoded (as in the example you gave), you can do this:

#include ...

char path[100] = "C:/......";

int main()
{
    [...]

    out = function();
}

If the path needs to be computed, do this instead:

#include ...

char path[100];

int main()
{
    [...]
    std::copy(computedPathValue, computedPathValue + computedPathLength + 1, path);

    out = function();
}

Of course, the best would be to have std::string path instead of a char[100].

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You are defining the path variable within the scope of your main function, as well as in the global scope.

In main() you have a new declaration of path:

char path[100] = "...";

This effectively gives you two variables with the same name, but in different scopes. If you access path from within the main method, it will access the locally-scoped variable.

If you wish to keep it this way, and remove the globally-scoped path variable, you could redeclare your function to:

int function(char* p_path)
{
    imwrite(p_path, image);
}

and pass the value as a parameter from main:

char path[100] = "...";
...
function(path);

As an aside, you could force access of the globally-scoped variable from within the main method by referencing ::path, which specifies the global namespace. But that's another story.

share|improve this answer
    
No, you're not. It's fine to declare a variable multiple times, but these are two definitions. And they define two variables. "Definition" = "Here is ..."; "declaration" = "there is ..." –  MSalters Dec 4 '12 at 13:37
    
That's what I meant by re-declaring. I added information about the scope of the two declarations. –  icabod Dec 4 '12 at 13:40
1  
You're still confusing the terms "definition" and "declaration". A second declaration would NOT give you two variables. A second definition DOES. –  MSalters Dec 4 '12 at 13:43
    
Fair point, I'll change the text :) –  icabod Dec 4 '12 at 13:44

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