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I'm a beginner in C language. After reading the initial chapters of Ritchie's book, I wrote a program to generate random numbers and alphabets.

The program compiles fine with gcc. However on running it, it gives an error "Segmentation fault", which is incomprehensible to my limited knowledge. I'd be glad to understand what I've written wrong.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h> 
#include "conio.h"
#include <time.h>


long int genrandom(int,int);
void randAlph(void);
char letterize(int);

int main (void) {
//     char full[9];
//     char part_non[4];  
    srand(time(0));        

    int i;
    for (i=0;i<50;++i) {
      randAlph();
    };

}

long int genrandom(int mino,int maxo) {
    int val=mino+rand()/(RAND_MAX/(maxo-mino)+1);
    return val;  
}

void randAlph (){
  int val;
  char text;
val=genrandom(0,26);
//  return val;
text=letterize(val);
printf("%s ,",text);

}

char letterize(int num) {
  char letter='A'+num;
  return letter;
}
share|improve this question
    
printf("%c,", text); –  UmNyobe Dec 4 '12 at 13:34
1  
Pass the -Wall flag to gcc and it will give you a warning about this issue. –  interjay Dec 4 '12 at 13:37
    
To generate numbers in an interval you can use the formula: int val=mino+rand()%(maxo+1); –  banuj Dec 4 '12 at 13:41
1  
@banuj, As per this article, that wasnt advised. –  Droidzone Dec 4 '12 at 13:48
    
@interjay, Thanks for the tip about -Wall. –  Droidzone Dec 4 '12 at 13:54

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

printf("%s ,",text); is wrong - it says that text is a nul-terminated array of chars. Use

printf("%c ,", text);

instead to print your single char.

share|improve this answer
    
Beautiful. Thank you. I dont remember seeing a %c formatting character. I understand now. I guess if I wanted to use a string instead, I have to add '\0' as terminal char? –  Droidzone Dec 4 '12 at 13:38
    
@Droidzone Yes. You'd also need to make text a char array rather than a single char to provide storaeg for the terminating '\0' character. –  simonc Dec 4 '12 at 13:40
#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h> 
#include "conio.h"
#include <time.h>


int genrandom(int,int);
void randAlph(void);
char letterize(int);

int main (void) {
//     char full[9];
//     char part_non[4];  
    srand(time(0));        

    int i;
    for (i=0;i<50;++i) {
      randAlph();
    };

}

int genrandom(int mino,int maxo) {//changed function return type to int
    int val=mino+rand()/(RAND_MAX/(maxo-mino)+1); //Be careful when you are using '/' operator with integers
    return val;  //returning int here why set return type to long int?
}

void randAlph (){
  int val;
  char text;
  val=genrandom(0,26);
  //  return val;
  text=letterize(val);
  printf("%c ,",text);//Replace %s with %c

}

char letterize(int num) { //No bound checking on num eh?
  char letter='A'+num;
  return letter;
}

That's all I had to say. :)

share|improve this answer
1  
Asking the OP to scan through 40+ lines of code looking for the one you've changed/commented isn't the most helpful approach. You're also duplicating two previous answers. Posting a new answer with additional information may be helpful; its harder to see much value in just providing the same answer without any explanation and in a less readable form. –  simonc Dec 4 '12 at 14:33
    
I appreciate your concerns, but please look again. I am not just giving the solution to OP's problem, but a working code and some suggestions OP should consider reviewing. There was no way I could've done it better, I guess. –  askmish Dec 4 '12 at 14:44
2  
Ah, I see now. In that case, I withdraw my previous comment and replace it with a suggestion that you start this sort of post with a comment explaining that you have tidied up the sample code, commenting interesting changes inline. It wasn't at all clear to me (and presumably other readers) that you'd gone to so much trouble. –  simonc Dec 4 '12 at 14:47
    
@askmish, Your comments were most useful. Thank you! –  Droidzone Dec 4 '12 at 14:50

Why use %s when text is char. You dont need a string type in the function. Just a char would do. Change in the function : void randAlph ()

printf("%s ,",text);

to

printf("%c ,", text);
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