Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.
SELECT TOP 1 Col1,col2
FROM table ... JOIN table2
...Some stuff...
 ORDER BY DESC

gives different result. compared to

SELECT Col1,col2
FROM table ... JOIN table2
...Some stuff...
 ORDER BY DESC

2nd query gives me some rows , When I want the Top 1 of this result I write the 1st query with TOP 1 clause. These both give different results.

why is this behavior different

share|improve this question
    
Assuming it's SQL Server, if you try "TOP 1 WITH TIES", what do you get as result? Also... Can you post the more of the SQL? Specially, the source (table) from Col1, Col2 and the ORDER BY? Finally, it wouldn't hurt to have some data. –  Luiz Angelo Dec 4 '12 at 17:20
add comment

migrated from programmers.stackexchange.com Dec 4 '12 at 14:27

This question came from our site for professional programmers interested in conceptual questions about software development.

3 Answers

This isn't very clear, but I guess you mean the row returned by the first query isn't the same as the first row returned by the second query. This could be because your order by has duplicate values in it.

Say, for example, you had a table called Test

+-----+------+
| Seq | Name |
+-----+------+
| 1   | A    |
| 1   | B    |
| 2   | C    |
+-----+------+

If you did Select * From Test Order By Seq, either of these is valid

+-----+------+
| Seq | Name |
+-----+------+
| 1   | A    |
| 1   | B    |
| 2   | C    |
+-----+------+

+-----+------+
| Seq | Name |
+-----+------+
| 1   | B    |
| 1   | A    |
| 2   | C    |
+-----+------+

With the top, you could get either row.

Having the top 1 clause could mean the query optimizer uses a completely different approach to generate the results.

share|improve this answer
add comment

I'm going to assume that you're working in SQL Server, so Laurence's answer is probably accurate. But for completeness, this also depends on what database technology you are using.

Typically, index-based databases, like SQL Server, will return results that are sorted by the index, depending on how the execution plan is created. But not all databases utilize indices.

Netezza, for example, keeps track of where data lives in the system without the concept of an index (Netezza's system architecture is quite a bit different). As a result, selecting the 1st record of a query will result in a random record from the result set floating to the top. Executing the same query multiple times will likely result in a different order each time.

If you have a requirement to order data, then it is in your best interest to enforce the ordering yourself instead of relying on the arbitrary ordering that the database will use when creating its execution plan. This will make your results more predictable.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your 1st query will get one table's top row and compare with another table with condition. So it will return different values compare to normal join.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.