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My last question was closed after 2 minutes. I am simply asking for help with the member functions. I should have member functions checking the following:

  1. whether the square is external to another;
  2. whether the square contains another square;
  3. whether the square is contained into another square;
  4. whether the square is tangent externally to another square (that is, whether their borders are in contact but, except those border points, they are external to each other);
  5. whether the square is tangent internally to another square (that is, they have points on the borders in common but, except those border points, one square is contained into the other one);
  6. whether the border of the square intersects the border of another square.

my private members are: double x,y;

Should i have the public member functions then, using both x and y to compute the perimeter and area?

This is what i have so far: the header file

#include  <iostream>
#include  <cmath>
class Square
{
int x, y;
int  size;

public:
Square(int x, int y, int size) : x(x), y(y), size(size) { }
~Square() {};
bool isExternal(const Square& rhs);
bool contains(const Square& otherSquare);
bool iscontained(const Square& otherSquare);

bool borderintersect (const Square& otherSquare);
bool bordertangent (const Square& otherSquare);
}

The implementation

#include "Square.h"


bool Square::isExternal(const Square& rhs) const {
    return (((x < rhs.x) || ((x + size) > (rhs.x + rhs.size)) &&  ((y < rhs.y) || ((y + size) > (rhs.y + rhs.size)) 
};
bool Square::contains(const Square& otherSquare)const {
};
bool Square::iscontained(const Square& otherSquare)const {
};

bool borderintersect(const Square& othersquare)
{
// If this square's bottom is greater than the other square's top
if ((this->y - (this->size / 2)) > (othersquare->y + (othersquare->size / 2)))
{
    return (false);
}
// the reverse
if ((this->y + (this->size / 2)) < (othersquare->y - (othersquare->size / 2)))
{
    return (false);
}
// If this square's left is greater than the other square's right
if ((this->x - (this->size / 2)) > (othersquare->x + (othersquare->size / 2)))
{
    return (false);
}

if ((this->x + (this->size / 2)) < (othersquare->x - (othersquare->size / 2)))
{
    return (false);
}
return (true);

bool Square::bordertangent (const Square& otherSquare)const {
};

The test program

#include "Square.h"
#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

  int main() {

Square sq1(0, 0, 10);
Square sq2(1, 1, 10);

    if(sq1.isExternal(sq2)) {
    cout<<"Square 1 is external to square 2"<<endl;
}

if(sq1.contains(sq2){
    cout<<"Square 1 contains square 2"<<endl;

return 0;
}

Should i include this in the header file in order to get both the x and y of the coordinate and the size?

double  getX( )  const {  return x;  }
double  getY( )  const {  return y;  }
double  getSize( )  const {  return size;  }               
share|improve this question
2  
What do x and y signify, exactly ? –  Paul R Dec 4 '12 at 14:32
2  
I see no need for such functions (perimeter() and area()). They aren't among, nor required by, your listed requirements. And if you have them, I see no reason for them to be public. Does that answer your question? –  Beta Dec 4 '12 at 14:32
5  
You're not asking for help, you're asking to get your job done. "please, write my homework" is not a valid question, at least not here. –  Agent_L Dec 4 '12 at 14:32
1  
Presumably since x,y are almost certainly some x,y co-ordinate for some part of the square you are modelling - You'll need a length at least to be able to do any more. –  Caribou Dec 4 '12 at 14:36
2  
Oh seriously - get some graph paper and cut out some squares - it is the physical manifestation of what you are trying to do - it should help you to model it on the computer then –  Caribou Dec 4 '12 at 14:39

2 Answers 2

It seems like you're tripping up on where to start with implementing the class so I'll give you some guidance there. All of your questions deal with checking the relative positions of two squares in some coordinate space. To answer them, you will need to know two things about each square:

  • Position (x, y coordinates (often a corner of the square))
  • Size (size)

Assuming you definitely mean square, then the width and height are equal, so you only need one variable to store the size. If you can actually have rectangles, then you'll need width and height. These will need to be members of your Square class because each Square should have its own position and size. You do not need to store the coordinates of each corner of your square because you can work them out from the position and size - storing data that you can work out from data you already have is known as redundancy and is generally something you want to avoid. Here is how that would look in two different coordinate systems (one where y goes down and the other where y goes up):

 x-->
y                size
|   (x,y).___________________
v        |                   |
         |                   |
         |                   |
         |                   |
    size |                   |
         |                   |
         |                   |
         |                   |
         |___________________| (x+size, y+size)

          ___________________ (x+size, y+size)
         |                   |
         |                   |
         |                   |
         |                   |
    size |                   |
         |                   |
         |                   |
^        |                   |
|   (x,y).___________________|
y                size
  x-->

As an alternative, you could store two positions which are two opposite corners of your square. However, if you really are dealing with squares, not rectangles, you will need to manually enforce the invariant that the points must be the same distance away from each other along both axes. Rectangles would not have this invariant so this would be more applicable for them, but then operations such as translation become more complicated (you would now have to move two points rather than just one).

You will not need perimeter or area member functions. None of the questions require you to know either of these things. All of the questions can be answered by doing simple comparison between the positions and sizes of the two squares.

Whether you have them be private or not is a design issue. By making them private, you can control access to them through the Square's interface. You could then provide public member functions so that you can check for answers to some of your questions, such as bool Square::contains(const Square& otherSquare) which you would call like square.contains(otherSquare). Here's the beginnings of a possible class definition:

class Square
{
 private:
  int x, y, size;
 public:
  Square(int x, int y, int size) : x(x), y(y), size(size) { }
  bool contains(const Square& other)
  {
    // Do comparisons between x, y, size and other.x, other.y, other.size
  }
  // ...
};

Alternatively, you could have the functions at namespace scope (not members of Square) and either make them friends of Square or make the position and size members of Square public. For such a simple example, this will not be a problem.


Should I include this in the header file in order to get both the x and y of the coordinate and the size?

double  getX( )  const {  return x;  }
double  getY( )  const {  return y;  }
double  getSize( )  const {  return size;  }   

These kinds of functions are commonly known as getters. They provide access to private member variables of a class. In your case, you do not need to provide these getters because the functions you are writing are member functions of Square. The member functions of Square have access to the private members of any other Square, so you don't need to get access through these getters.

However, if you wanted some other class to access the x, y, and size values for a given Square, then you would need to provide getters (or make the members public).

share|improve this answer
1  
+1 for patience and making me take a step back.... –  Caribou Dec 4 '12 at 14:48
    
I think it would be easier to start with a point (an x and a y coordinate) and the length of the side. The square will then move "length" to the right and then length downwards, then length left, then length upwards? –  Kristy Aloumary Dec 4 '12 at 14:57
    
@KristyAloumary From my experience, it is most common to store one corner (often the top or bottom left) and then the edges extend in one direction away from that. If you were to do as you said, the position would be the centre of the square and the length of an edge of the square would be 2*length. –  Joseph Mansfield Dec 4 '12 at 15:00
    
@KristyAloumary I've added an ASCII diagram that might help. –  Joseph Mansfield Dec 4 '12 at 15:03
2  
@KristyAloumary I understand that you're new to the site. Welcome! Your best course of action right now is to try to implement the functions. When you've done your very best and it still doesn't work, ask a new question instead of updating this one. In that new question post all of the code you've written, what you expect the result to be and what's actually happening. Then I or somebody else will help you there. I will respond to your question about getXXX() functions in my answer here. –  Joseph Mansfield Dec 4 '12 at 15:35

Start with something like this, and go from there

class Square
{
    double m_x, m_y;
    double m_length;

    public:
    Square(double x, double y, double length) : m_x(x), m_y(y), m_length(length) {}
    ~Square() {};

    bool isExternal(const Square& rhs);
}

--- implementation
bool Square::isExternal(const Square& rhs) 
{
    bool retval = true;
    // do some calculations ..
    return retval;
}


--- main

int main(void)
{
    Square sq1(0, 0, 10);
    Square sq1(1, 1, 10);

    if(sq1.isExternal(sq2) {
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Just avoid leading _ because they're reserved for the implementation in many cases. –  Mark B Dec 4 '12 at 14:48
    
may i ask what the underscores are? –  Kristy Aloumary Dec 4 '12 at 14:49
    
@MarkB you are right, sorry don't want to show bad example. –  dmaij Dec 4 '12 at 14:51
    
What significance does the underscore have? –  Kristy Aloumary Dec 4 '12 at 14:56
    
So you can see whether a variable is a member variable. It's a variable naming convention. –  dmaij Dec 4 '12 at 14:57

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