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I need to convert a value from one unit to another according to a non constant factor. The input value range from 0 to 1073676289 and the range value range from 0 to 1155625. The conversion can be described like this:

output = input * (range / 1073676289)

My own initial fixed point implementation feels a bit clumsy:

// Input values (examples)
unsigned int input = 536838144;  // min 0, max 1073676289
unsigned int range = 1155625;    // min 0, max 1155625

// Conversion
unsigned int tmp = (input >> 16) * ((range) >> 3u);
unsigned int output = (tmp / ((1073676289) >> 16u)) << 3u;

Can my code be improved to be simpler or to have better accuracy?

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What is your intended output range? (Is it that (a*b)<=1.0? If maximum value of a*b <= 1.102 (*2^n) is allowed, things will be faster) (and it's quite clear that floats/doubles are out of question) –  Aki Suihkonen Dec 4 '12 at 15:15
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4 Answers

A quick trip out to google brought http://sourceforge.net/projects/fixedptc/ to my attention

It's a c library in a header for managing fixed point math in 32 or 64 bit integers.

A little bit of experimentation with the following code:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdint.h>

#define FIXEDPT_BITS        64

#include "fixedptc.h"

int main(int argc, char ** argv)
{
    unsigned int input = 536838144;  // min 0, max 1073676289
    unsigned int range = 1155625;    // min 0, max 1155625

    // Conversion
    unsigned int tmp = (input >> 16) * ((range) >> 3u);
    unsigned int output = (tmp / ((1073676289) >> 16u)) << 3u;

    double output2 = (double)input * ((double)range / 1073676289.0);

    uint32_t output3 = fixedpt_toint(fixedpt_xmul(fixedpt_fromint(input), fixedpt_xdiv(fixedpt_fromint(range), fixedpt_fromint(1073676289))));

    printf("baseline = %g, better = %d, library = %d\n", output2, output, output3);

    return 0;
}

Got me the following results:

baseline = 577812, better = 577776, library = 577812

Showing better precision (matching the floating point) than you were getting with your code. Under the hood it's not doing anything terribly complicated (and doesn't work at all in 32 bits)

/* Multiplies two fixedpt numbers, returns the result. */
static inline fixedpt
fixedpt_mul(fixedpt A, fixedpt B)
{
    return (((fixedptd)A * (fixedptd)B) >> FIXEDPT_FBITS);
}


/* Divides two fixedpt numbers, returns the result. */
static inline fixedpt
fixedpt_div(fixedpt A, fixedpt B)
{
    return (((fixedptd)A << FIXEDPT_FBITS) / (fixedptd)B);
}

But it does show that you can get the precision you want. You'll just need 64 bits to do it

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This will give you the best precision with no floating point values and the result will be rounded to the nearest integer value:

output = (input * (long long) range + 536838144) / 1073676289;
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+1 for the "round to nearest" bias –  Brendan Dec 4 '12 at 15:20
    
Why did you add 536838144? –  banuj Dec 4 '12 at 15:20
2  
@banuj: 536838144 is half of 1073676289; and causes the final result to be rounded to the nearest integer instead of truncated. For example, 1073676288/1073676289 = 0 but (1073676288+536838144)/1073676289 = 1. –  Brendan Dec 4 '12 at 15:23
    
@banuj: as Brendan said, it's for rounding. More precisely it's floor(denominator/2). Two more examples "on the edge" of integer: (536838144 + 536838144) / 1073676289 = 0 but (536838145 + 536838144) / 1073676289 = 1. –  user1871166 Dec 4 '12 at 16:01
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The problem is that input * range would overflow a 32-bit integer. Fix that by using a 64-bit integer.

uint64_least_t tmp;
tmp = input;
tmp = tmp * range;
tmp = tmp / 1073676289ul;
output = temp;
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You won't get it any simpler then output = input * (range / 1073676289)

As noted below in the comments if you are restircted to integer operations then for range < 1073676289: range / 1073676289 == 0 so you would be good to go with:

output = range < 1073676289 ? 0 : input

If that is not what you wanted and you actually want precision then

output = (input * range) / 1073676289

will be the way to go.

If you need to do a lot of those then i suggest you use double and have your compiler vectorise your operations. Precision will be ok too.

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2  
Because range is always less than 1073676289 and you're using integer division; output = input * (range / 1073676289) would be the same as output = input * 0. –  Brendan Dec 4 '12 at 15:02
    
I don't think a * (b / c) is equal to (a * b) / c .. –  Niklas R Dec 4 '12 at 15:05
    
I am sorry if i have been unclear, but i can not use floating point values (nor doubles). –  Vandhunden Dec 4 '12 at 15:05
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