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I have the following javascript line:

<div id="box" name="1" margin="4px" padding="4px" onclick="memory(1)"></div>

With the associated memory() function being:

function memory(a) {
    var tmpDar = a-1;
    var m = document.getElementsByName(tmpDar);
    m.innerHTML = arrA[tmpDar];

}

However, when I try executing the code, the HTML doesn't alter... Can somebody please help me?

share|improve this question
    
What are the contents of arrA? –  Michael Berkowski Dec 4 '12 at 14:51
    
And Do you really have an element named 0? (tmpDar) I think probably not. Your getElementsByName(tmpDar) looks to be faulty. –  Michael Berkowski Dec 4 '12 at 14:52
    
arrA is dynamically populated with random numbers between 0 and 999 using another function –  max0005 Dec 4 '12 at 14:52
    
Did you define the script in your html page within the <script></script> tag? –  Daniele B Dec 4 '12 at 14:52
    
@user1394965 I cannot use id as I use id as a reference to the stylesheet to style the div –  max0005 Dec 4 '12 at 14:53

3 Answers 3

document.getElementsByName() returns a NodeList and not a single element!

So in order to set the innerHTML of your div, you have to reference an entry inside that array, e.g., like this:

function memory(a) {
    var tmpDar = a-1;
    var m = document.getElementsByName(tmpDar);
    m[0].innerHTML = arrA[tmpDar];
}

In your code you set the innerHTML property for the NodeList object, which has no (visual) effect in the document.

In general it would be better to use id instead of name. Then you could use document.getElementById() in a way like this:

function memory(a) {
    var tmpDar = a-1;
    var m = document.getElementById(tmpDar);
    m.innerHTML = arrA[tmpDar];
}
share|improve this answer
    
Damned! You have been just faster than me :) –  Samuel Caillerie Dec 4 '12 at 14:55
    
Still, look at the value of tmpDar. Does that look like an id or element name? –  Michael Berkowski Dec 4 '12 at 14:57
    
@MichaelBerkowski Wondering about numbers for name attributes, too. But the only reference I found was this, which allows any "non-empty value" for the name attribute. –  Sirko Dec 4 '12 at 15:03

document.getElementsByName returns an array. So if the element that you want is unique with this name, you should replace your code by :

function memory(a) {
    var tmpDar = a-1;
    var m = document.getElementsByName(tmpDar);
    m[0].innerHTML = arrA[tmpDar];  // Here I have added index 0
}
share|improve this answer
    
This worked, thank you very much!!! ;D –  max0005 Dec 4 '12 at 14:57

your trying to find all elements with a name of 0 as far as I can tell. And there is no 0 name.

Also what the other two said, it returns an array you need to call an index on that array.

share|improve this answer
    
It's getElementsByName(), not getElementsByTagName(), but still, the name attribute is unlikely to be tmpDar's value 0 –  Michael Berkowski Dec 4 '12 at 14:58
    
@MichaelBerkowski your right I misread that. updated –  ryan Dec 4 '12 at 15:00

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