Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I want to simulate fault on a message (Eg: 1000010011 => 1010000011). Is there a way to implement this in Python? I tried the following, which works:

import random
a = "1011101101"
b = [el for el in a] # b = ['1', '0', '1', '1', '1', '0', '1', '1', '0', '1']
random.shuffle(b)
print b # b = ['0', '1', '1', '1', '0', '1', '1', '1', '1', '0']
random.shuffle(b, random.random)
print b # b = ['1', '1', '0', '1', '1', '0', '1', '0', '1', '1']

I would like my reordering to be Normally/Gaussian distributed. Eg:

import random
a = "1011101101"
b = [el for el in a] # b = ['1', '0', '1', '1', '1', '0', '1', '1', '0', '1']
random.shuffle(b,random.gauss(0.5,0.1))
print b # b = ['1', '0', '1', '1', '0', '0', '1', '1', '1', '1'] <= assume this is Gaussian distributed...
# OR
c = random.gauss(0.5,0.1)
random.shuffle(b,c)
print b # b = ['0', '0', '1', '1', '1', '0', '1', '1', '1', '1'] <= assume this is also Gaussian distributed...

However, this does not work, and I get the message:

Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
  File "C:\Python27\lib\random.py", line 287, in shuffle
    j = int(random() * (i+1))
TypeError: 'float' object is not callable

Any suggestion/comment would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks

Note: I am only asking for re-ordering error here(Eg: 1000010011 => 1010000011). However, I am also planning on simulating burst-error(Eg: 1000010011 => 1011111011), single events(Eg: 1000010011 => 1000010011), etc.

Other related question: Python: binary string error simulation

share|improve this question
1  
You could replace your list comprehension for b with a simple b = list(a). –  Droogans Dec 4 '12 at 15:55
add comment

2 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The second argument of random.shuffle should be a callable, not a float. Try:

random.shuffle(b, lambda:random.gauss(0.5,0.1))

To cap in the interval from 0 to 1, you could use

random.shuffle(b, lambda: max(0.0, min(1.0, random.gauss(0.5,0.1))))

(Thanks @DSM)

If you're pedantic, the above capping actually includes 1.0, which would lead to an error in random.shuffle. You should in fact replace 1.0 by the largest float smaller than 1.0.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks a lot @silvado –  nicolas.leblanc Dec 4 '12 at 15:31
1  
Note that depending on the parameters it might be necessary to cap the random results to make sure they're in [0.0, 1.0). –  DSM Dec 4 '12 at 16:10
add comment
c = lambda: random.gauss(0.5,0.1)
share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.