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In Python, is it possible to encapsulate exactly the common slice syntax and pass it around? I know that I can use slice or __slice__ to emulate slicing. But I want to pass the exact same syntax that I would put in the square brackets that would get used with __getitem__.

For example, suppose I wrote a function to return some slice of a list.

def get_important_values(some_list, some_condition, slice):
    elems = filter(some_condition, some_list)
    return elems[slice]

This works fine if I manually pass in a slice object:

In [233]: get_important_values([1,2,3,4], lambda x: (x%2) == 0, slice(0, None))
Out[233]: [2, 4]

But what I want to let the user pass is exactly the same slicing they would have used with __getitem__:

get_important_values([1,2,3,4], lambda x: (x%2) == 0, (0:-1) )

# or

get_important_values([1,2,3,4], lambda x: (x%2) == 0, (0:) )

Obviously this generates a syntax error. But is there any way to make this work, without writing my own mini parser for the x:y:t type slices, and forcing the user to pass them as strings?

Motivation

I could just make this example function return something directly sliceable, such as filter(some_condition, some_list), which will be the whole result as a list. In my actual example, however, the internal function is much more complicated, and if I know the slice that the user wants ahead of time, I can greatly simplify the calculation. But I want the user to not have to do much extra to tell me the slice ahead of time.

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1  
Where you wrote __getattr__ I assume you mean __getitem__. –  Iguananaut Dec 4 '12 at 15:32
    
Yes, sorry. I'll edit to fix it above. –  EMS Dec 4 '12 at 15:33
1  
It would be kind of cool if Python had such a thing as "slice literals". I don't imagine it would be too hard to hack into the language but I imagine such a suggestion would be rejected as mostly unnecessary. –  Iguananaut Dec 4 '12 at 15:44
    
For numpy users, there is one more answer here using numpy.s_. –  gerrit Mar 1 '13 at 16:58
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3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Perhaps something along the following lines would work for you:

class SliceMaker(object):
  def __getitem__(self, item):
    return item

make_slice = SliceMaker()

print make_slice[3]
print make_slice[0:]
print make_slice[:-1]
print make_slice[1:10:2,...]

The idea is that you use make_slice[] instead of manually creating instances of slice. By doing this you'll be able to use the familiar square brackets syntax in all its glory.

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This is a great idea. It's a lot cleaner than passing around the individual bounds of the slice. If I have to slightly burden the users of this with making their own slice input, I think this is the least intrusive of the suggestions so far. –  EMS Dec 4 '12 at 15:42
4  
Note that NumPy has this built in as np.s_: docs.scipy.org/doc/numpy/reference/generated/numpy.s_.html –  ecatmur Mar 1 '13 at 16:11
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One way (for simple slices) would be to have the slice argument either be a dict or an int,

ie

get_important_values([1, 2, 3, 4], lambda x: (x%2) == 0, {0: -1})

or

get_important_values([1, 2, 3, 4], lambda x: (x%2) == 0, 1)

then the syntax would stay more or less the same.

This wouldn't work though, for when you want to do things like

some_list[0:6:10..]
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In short, no. That syntax is only valid in the context of the [] operator. I might suggest accepting a tuple as input and then pass that tuple to slice(). Alternatively, maybe you could redesign whatever you're doing so that get_important_values() is somehow implemented as a sliceable object.

For example, you could do something like:

class ImportantValueGetter(object):
    def __init__(self, some_list, some_condition):
        self.some_list = some_list
        self.some_condition = some_condition

    def __getitem__(self, key):
        # Here key could be an int or a slice; you can do some type checking if necessary
        return filter(self.some_condition, self.some_list)[key]

You can probably do one better by turning this into a Container ABC of some sort but that's the general idea.

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How can I emulate the context of []? Also, a tuple could work. But I don't like the need to distinguish between using None to imply (get everything) versus just leaving out that option. If slice took keywords, it might make it better. –  EMS Dec 4 '12 at 15:35
    
Also, if I just wanted get_important_values to be directly sliceable, I would just return filter(some_condition, some_list) directly, which will be the whole result as a list. In my actual example, the internal function is much more complicated, and if I know the slice that the user wants ahead of time, I can greatly simplify the calculation. But I want the user to not have to do much extra to tell me the slice ahead of time. –  EMS Dec 4 '12 at 15:44
    
You could still do that with this example. In __getitem__ if key is a slice (use isinstance(key, slice) then you can access all the start, stop, and step attributes of the slice object and manipulate them/optimize on them at will before applying it directly to the filter result. –  Iguananaut Dec 4 '12 at 15:46
    
I agree with you that I could do it this way, and this is a useful motif to keep in mind for other situations where this design fits a little better. –  EMS Dec 4 '12 at 15:50
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