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I have a question.

I have an ajax submit that wouldn't run no matter what I tried. That is until I found a tutorial that had the submit wrapped in a $(function () {}); call. I then wrapped my .submit in a function call and it seemed to have worked. The thing that boggles my mind is that I have other .submit ajax function calls that work just as well without being wrapped in a function. I am wondering if I am missing a jquery nuance here that I don't understand?

To more fully illustrate what I mean, here is my function before and after I wrap it in a function...

Before...

    $("#FormPutMsg1").submit(function (e) {
        debugger;
        e.preventDefault();
        //animateSpinner();
        var theURL = this.action;
        var type = "POST";//this.methd;
        var data = $(this).serialize();
        $.ajax({
            url: this.action,
            type: this.method,
            data: $(this).serialize(),
            dataType: "json",
            success: function (result) {
                debugger;
                var data = result;
                if (data.split(':')[0] == "Error") {
                    //$("#list").unblock();
                    $('#resultDiv').html('<b><p style="color: #ff00ff">' + data + '</p></b>');
                    setTimeout(function () {
                        $('#resultDiv').html("");
                    }, 10000);
                }
                else {
                    binddata(data);
                }
            }
        });
        return false;
    });

After (this one works)...

$(function () {
    $("#FormPutMsg1").submit(function (e) {
        debugger;
        e.preventDefault();
        //animateSpinner();
        var theURL = this.action;
        var type = "POST";//this.methd;
        var data = $(this).serialize();
        $.ajax({
            url: this.action,
            type: this.method,
            data: $(this).serialize(),
            dataType: "json",
            success: function (result) {
                debugger;
                var data = result;
                if (data.split(':')[0] == "Error") {
                    //$("#list").unblock();
                    $('#resultDiv').html('<b><p style="color: #ff00ff">' + data + '</p></b>');
                    setTimeout(function () {
                        $('#resultDiv').html("");
                    }, 10000);
                }
                else {
                    binddata(data);
                }
            }
        });
        return false;
    });
});

Before I wrapped my function in a function the regular submit functionality prevaled (because e.preventDefault was never called I presume). Am I missing something gentlemen (and ladies)?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The original code block will never got executed because "#FormPutMsg1" wont yet exist. The second code block is executed after the page has been loaded so "#FormPutMsg1" would exist.

$("#FormPutMsg1").submit() requires a trigger for it be executed. Wrapping it with "$(function() {})" will execute the block on page load. You could also trigger it using a click' event.

"$(function() {})" is a shortcut for "$(document).ready(function() {})"

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I don't mean to be controversial here, but I have code that does exactly that. It is not wrapped in documenet.ready or a function call of any kind. But yet the code still executes. I must be missing something in there as well. –  DmainEvent Dec 4 '12 at 15:49
    
The 'after' code is wrapped in a "$(function() {})". I'm confused as to why you say it isn't. "$(function() {})" will execute the code once the page has loaded. –  Peter Richmond Dec 4 '12 at 15:54
    
I mean to say that I have other code elsewhere that isn't wrapped in that or that does indeed work. –  DmainEvent Dec 4 '12 at 16:12

Based on my expertise (which isn't exactly awesome) I think the "$(function () {})" is the same thing as document.ready.

Alas, the script inside this function will be executed when the DOM is fully loaded.

In the first case the script is trying to execute before your element has been loaded, hence it doesn't work.

In the second case the script waits until all elements in the DOM has been loaded before it executes.

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