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I have 3 viewmodels which all have to show the fullname of a person.

Now i offcourse can duplicate the GetFullName() function in all 3 viewmodels, but that is not so dry.

But where then do i leave the logic to calculate the persons fullname?

  • Do i create an interface with the four fields (we calculate the fullname of four fields) and implement the interface in all 3 viewmodels and create a 'PersonHelper' class which takes the interface and returns a string?
  • Is it too little of logic to create it's own class?
  • Do i create a base class for the 3 viewmodels with the logic in it? (but what then if i want to use the function in a API function?)
  • Is the Helper maybe called a PersonService because in the old days it was logic which was placed in the Person class itself but now we separate the data classes from the behaviour (so maybe 'PersonBehaviour'?)

Such a simple thing, and so many ways to implement it.

What our your thoughts on it?

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1  
If you're doing DDD, you'd better implement it on the domain model. From the options you mention, I'd choose to create an interface and a PersonHelper(PersonService, just name conventions). –  Nathan Dec 4 '12 at 15:58
    
Aha, i'm not familiar with DDD so i'm probably not :-) –  Michel Dec 4 '12 at 16:05
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4 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

We have a 'formatter' class which handles formatting certain data such as displaying an address line over multiple lines or just a single line.

We call it like this: Formatter.FormatAddress(address) where address is a Model class instance. You could easily apply such logic with your fullname.


Another option would be to write your own HtmlHelperExtensions so you could just do Html.FormatFullName(Model.FirstName, Model.LastName).

public static IHtmlString FormatFullName(this HtmlHelper helper, params string[] names)
{
    return new MvcHtmlString(helper.Encode(string.Join(" ", names)));
}

It isn't considered bad practice to add html to HtmlHelperExtensions either so that's nice imho.

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The OP makes no mention of using HTML, so the HtmlHelperExtension idea may now be valid - this is a question of laying out the underlying classes rather than outputting to HTML or any other display technology. –  ZombieSheep Dec 4 '12 at 16:04
    
Ok, i put this example in the 'helper' class code, is that correct? –  Michel Dec 4 '12 at 16:12
    
This is an extension method (msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/vstudio/bb383977.aspx). You have to import the namespace (using extensions.namespace;) to use it. Best place to do this for using them in Views is in the Web.config of your Views folder. –  Peter Dec 5 '12 at 8:19
    
@ZombieSheep I think the answer to the question is that you should not model this in the underlying classes. It is a matter of displaying some values. This is view logic and should be in the view. I am providing a few solutions how to do this in a reusable way. –  Peter Apr 18 '13 at 14:45
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I would have my 3 view models implement a common interface IFormattablePerson featuring the fields used to calculate the fullname and rely on String.Format

This allows a very convenient way of extending display by just adding new string formats in a custom formatter.

This would lead to something like :

The common interface the View Models have to implement :

public interface IFormattablePerson: IFormattable
{
string FirstName{get;set;}
string LastName{get;set;}
}   

the same ToString() implementation, which will never change, in each View Model

public string ToString(string format, IFormatProvider formatProvider)
{
    if (formatProvider == null)
        return ToString(format, new FormatProviderIFormattablePerson());
    else
        return (formatProvider.GetFormat(typeof(IFormattablePerson)) as ICustomFormatter).Format(format, this, formatProvider);
}

This uses FormatProvider and CustomFormatter for the IFormattablePerson. Then you just need to add and implement new formats in the CustomFormatter

public class FormatProviderIFormattablePerson : IFormatProvider
{
    // String.Format calls this method to get an instance of an
    // ICustomFormatter to handle the formatting.
    public object GetFormat(Type service)
    {
        if (service == typeof(IFormattablePerson))
        {
            return new CustomFormatterIFormattablePerson();
        }
        else
        {
            return null;
        }
    }
}

public class CustomFormatterIFormattablePerson : ICustomFormatter
{
    public string Format(string format, object arg, IFormatProvider provider)
    {
        if (string.IsNullOrEmpty(format))
            format = "full";

        if (arg is IFormattablePerson)
        {
            IFormattablePerson t = (IFormattablePerson) arg;
            switch (format)
            {
                case "f": 
                    return t.FirstName;

                case "l": 
                    return t.LastName;

                case "full": 
                default:
                    return string.Format("{0} {1}",
                        t.FirstName,
                        t.LastName).Trim();
            }                   
        }
        if (arg is IFormattable)
            return string.Format(String.Format("{{0:{0}}}",format), arg);
        else
            return arg.ToString();
    }
}
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How about in a BaseClass for all three ViewModels

public string FirstName {get;set;}
public string LastName {get;set;}
public string FullName {get{return String.Format("{0} {1}",FirstName,LastName);}}

Using a baseclass will allow you to minimize code duplication for all three ViewModels. This is also a simple solution which is easy to understand (by future developers) and quick to change. Is there something about an API which would limit this funciotonality?

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The API is an example for the case where i don't have any of the 3 viewmodels in my context and i do need the FullName logic. –  Michel Dec 4 '12 at 16:06
    
Your base class doesn't have to be a 'ViewModel' it can just be any class higher up in the Inheritance chain and thus your return type in your API could inherit this same class as well... –  bluetoft Dec 4 '12 at 16:10
    
Ah ok, but my experience with large inheritance trees is that they get to generic or too large. Then in this case i inherit my viewmodels from this base class containing business logic, and that doesn't look gooed to me... –  Michel Dec 4 '12 at 16:15
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My first thought would be to ask if your view models are directly storing the user data, or exposing a class which contains the user name. If you aren't I'd probably re-factor the username data out to its own class (along with other user data, if that makes sense to your app, then put the FormattedFullName property in that class.

public class ViewModel1()
{
    public PersonData myPerson {get; set;}
    // other properties
}

public class ViewModel2()
{
    public PersonData myPerson {get; set;}
    // other properties
}

public class PersonData()
{
    public string forename { get; set; }
    public string surname { get; set; }
    public string FormattedFullName 
    { 
        get 
        { 
            return string.Format("{0} {1}", forename, surname); 
        } 
    }
    // other properties
}
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I notice you say in your question that you "separate the data classes from the behaviour". I would argue that a "Full Name" property is not behaviour, rather a property of the object that just happens to be derived from other bits of data. Is there a reason you think you shouldn't add this to a Person class? –  ZombieSheep Dec 4 '12 at 16:07
    
Nice. So in this case the original OO principles are used to create a new object with data properties and behaviour (the FormattedFullName). Looks ok. –  Michel Dec 4 '12 at 16:07
    
You are right, in this case it's not really behaviour. The reason i mentioned it is that all OO examples talk about classes with behaviour in it (for the strategy pattern, for polymorphism etc.) and in these days all the code examples show POCO classes and the behaviour are placed in separate classes (separation of concerns, the 's' in solid etc.) but where to put the things not in the poco class (the behaviour) is mostly out of sight (out of the example code). So in this case i could add it to the Person class, but my thoughts were wider :-)) –  Michel Dec 4 '12 at 16:11
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